What weaknesses and sorrows are shown in the faces and cries of people in “London”?

  

I need help with two essay questions.
1. How does imagery help evoke emotion in this poem? Choose three images from the poem and
describe the emotions that the images evoke.
Explain how the images are connected to the emotions.
To Marguerite: Continued
BY MATTHEW ARNOLD
Yes! in the sea of life enisled,
With echoing straits between us
thrown,
Dotting the shoreless watery wild,
We mortal millions live alone.
The islands feel the enclasping
flow,
And then their endless bounds they
know.
But when the moon their hollows
lights,
And they are swept by balms of
spring,
And in their glens, on starry
nights,
The nightingales divinely sing;
And lovely notes, from shore to
shore,
Across the sounds and channels
pour
Oh! then a longing like despair
Is to their farthest caverns sent;
For surely once, they feel, we were
Parts of a single continent!
Now round us spreads the watery
plain
Oh might our marges meet again!
Who ordered, that their longing’s
fire
Should be, as soon as kindled,
cooled?
Who renders vain their deep
desire?
A God, a God their severance ruled!
And bade betwixt their shores to be
The unplumbed, salt, estranging
sea.
2. How does London reflect the issues and characteristics of the
Romantic period? Describe three ways in
which the poem discusses or comments on the problems or issues. Your response should be 1-2 paragraphs long.
London
BY WILLIAM BLAKE
I wander thro’ each charter’d
street,
Near where the charter’d Thames
does flow.
And mark in every face I meet
Marks of weakness, marks of woe.
In every cry of every Man,
In every Infants cry of fear,
In every voice: in every ban,
The mind-forg’d manacles I
hear
How the Chimney-sweepers cry
Every blackning Church
appalls,
And the hapless Soldiers sigh
Runs in blood down Palace
walls
But most thro’ midnight streets I
hear
How the youthful Harlots curse
Blasts the new-born Infants
tear
And blights with plagues the Marriage hea

INTRODUCTION:

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The two poems “To Marguerite: Continued” by Matthew Arnold and “London” by William Blake explore different aspects of human life and emotions. “To Marguerite: Continued” reflects on the human desire for companionship and the feeling of isolation. On the other hand, “London” critiques the social and economic issues of 18th century England. Both poems use powerful imagery to convey their respective emotions and ideas.

DESCRIPTION OF ESSAY QUESTIONS:

1. How does imagery help evoke emotion in this poem? Choose three images from the poem and describe the emotions that the images evoke. Explain how the images are connected to the emotions.

In “To Marguerite: Continued,” Matthew Arnold uses vivid imagery to create a sense of loneliness and longing. The speaker describes how humans live alone in a sea of life and feel like disconnected islands. The images of the sea, moon, and nightingales evoke strong emotions of nostalgia and yearning for unity. The sea symbolizes the vastness and separation between humans, while the moon and nightingales represent the beauty and harmony that humans long for. The three images are interconnected as they all evoke a sense of longing and a desire to reunite with others.

2. How does London reflect the issues and characteristics of the Romantic period? Describe three ways in which the poem discusses or comments on the problems or issues.

“London” by William Blake is a poem that reflects the social and economic issues of the Romantic period in England. The poem discusses the problems of poverty, exploitation, and oppression. The “charter’d street” and “charter’d Thames” represent the commercialization and industrialization of society, which has led to the exploitation of the poor. The image of the chimney sweepers crying and the hapless soldiers sighing represent the suffering and oppression of the working class. The use of the term “mind-forged manacles” highlights the psychological impact of poverty and oppression on individuals. These images and themes are indicative of the Romantic period’s concern for social justice and the dehumanizing effects of modernization.

Objectives and Learning Outcomes:

1. How does imagery help evoke emotion in this poem? Choose three images from the poem and describe the emotions that the images evoke. Explain how the images are connected to the emotions.

Objectives:
– To understand the impact of imagery in poetry
– To identify specific emotions that are elicited by certain images
– To analyze the connection between imagery and emotion

Learning Outcomes:
– Students will be able to identify three specific images from the poem “To Marguerite: Continued” that evoke strong emotions
– Students will be able to explain how each image is connected to the emotions it elicits
– Students will be able to analyze the impact of imagery on the overall meaning and emotional impact of the poem

2. How does London reflect the issues and characteristics of the Romantic period? Describe three ways in which the poem discusses or comments on the problems or issues.

Objectives:
– To understand the characteristics of the Romantic period in literature
– To analyze the ways in which a specific poem reflects those characteristics
– To identify and discuss the social and political issues addressed in the poem

Learning Outcomes:
– Students will be able to identify three ways in which the poem “London” reflects the characteristics of the Romantic period
– Students will be able to analyze the ways in which the poem addresses social and political issues of the time period
– Students will be able to discuss the connections between the poem’s themes and the broader social and political context of the Romantic period.

Solution 1:

How Imagery in Matthew Arnold’s “To Marguerite: Continued” Evokes Emotion

The use of imagery is essential in evoking emotion in poetry, and in “To Marguerite: Continued,” Matthew Arnold uses various images to create emotional responses. Three images that stand out in the poem include the sea, the moon, and the nightingale. The image of the sea, in the first stanza, creates a sense of isolation and loneliness when Arnold writes, “We mortal millions live alone.” The image of the moonlight casting on the “hollows” of the island in the second stanza creates a feeling of serenity and a longing for something more significant. The image of the nightingales singing on “starry nights” in their “glens” in the same stanza evokes a sense of beauty and wonderment.

The images that Arnold uses connect to emotions and ideas presented in the poem. The sea represents separation and loneliness, and the moon represents hope and renewal. The nightingale and lovely notes connote beauty, wonderment, and longing for something more significant. Through these images, Arnold expresses the idea that although we are separated by vast distances, we all share similar longings and desires.

Solution 2:

How William Blake’s “London” Reflects the Issues and Characteristics of the Romantic Period

Many scholars agree that “London” by William Blake is a clear representation of the Romantic period. Blake’s poem discusses social issues and the suffering of individuals living in society, which was an essential component of Romantic literature. Three ways in which the poem reflects the Romantic period are through the depiction of the city, the use of imagery, and the emphasis on emotion.

Firstly, Blake’s depiction of London highlights the inequality and injustices of society. The city is presented as “chartered” and full of “marks of weakness, marks of woe.” Blake describes the oppressed masses, including the “Chimney-sweepers,” “hapless Soldiers,” and “youthful Harlots,” all of whom are considered victims of poverty and oppression. This depiction of the city reveals the Romantic emphasis on nature as a means for solace and healing.

Secondly, Blake’s imagery in the poem creates a sense of darkness and oppression. Blake’s use of “mind-forged manacles” conveys the idea that the people of London are trapped by their thoughts and beliefs. The “blackening Church” also represents a corrupt religious institution that does not support the welfare of its people. Blake’s use of imagery reveals the plights of the working-class and encourages the Romantic notion of individualism.

Lastly, Blake’s emphasis on emotion in London reflects the Romantic period’s fascination with individual emotion and experience. The poem’s tone is somber and melancholic as it describes the sorrows of living in a metropolis. Blake’s use of diction such as “cry of every Man,” “Infants cry of fear,” and “hapless soldiers sigh,” emphasizes the emotions that exist within London and narrates its people’s struggles. This emphasis on emotion was a critical aspect of Romanticism, as it sought to increase awareness of the individual’s emotional experience.

In summary, William Blake’s “London” is a representative example of Romanticism through the depiction of the city, use of imagery, and emphasis on emotion. The poem is a testament to the social problems of the time and remains a compelling work of literature that highlights the plights of the oppressed and downtrodden.

Suggested Resources/Books:

1. “The Romantic Poets” edited by John Keats
2. “The Poet’s Guide to Poetry” by Mary Kinzie
3. “Imagery and the Mind” edited by Ioannis Ziogas

Similar Asked Questions (for the first poem):

1. How does the use of metaphors affect the emotional impact of the poem?
2. What role does personification play in conveying the speaker’s emotions?
3. What is the significance of the nightingales’ song in the poem?
4. How does the specific language used in the poem convey emotion?
5. What themes are present in the poem and how are they connected to the imagery used?

Similar Asked Questions (for the second poem):

1. How does the speaker’s use of first-person narration contribute to the poem’s message?
2. What is the relationship between the physical city of London and the emotional landscape of the poem?
3. How does the poem’s structure contribute to its message?
4. What social or political issues are addressed in the poem?
5. How does the poem’s language reflect the characteristics of the Romantic period?I need help with two essay questions.
1. How does imagery help evoke emotion in this poem? Choose three images from the poem and
describe the emotions that the images evoke.
Explain how the images are connected to the emotions.
To Marguerite: Continued
BY MATTHEW ARNOLD
Yes! in the sea of life enisled,
With echoing straits between us
thrown,
Dotting the shoreless watery wild,
We mortal millions live alone.
The islands feel the enclasping
flow,
And then their endless bounds they
know.
But when the moon their hollows
lights,
And they are swept by balms of
spring,
And in their glens, on starry
nights,
The nightingales divinely sing;
And lovely notes, from shore to
shore,
Across the sounds and channels
pour
Oh! then a longing like despair
Is to their farthest caverns sent;
For surely once, they feel, we were
Parts of a single continent!
Now round us spreads the watery
plain
Oh might our marges meet again!
Who ordered, that their longing’s
fire
Should be, as soon as kindled,
cooled?
Who renders vain their deep
desire?
A God, a God their severance ruled!
And bade betwixt their shores to be
The unplumbed, salt, estranging
sea.
2. How does London reflect the issues and characteristics of the
Romantic period? Describe three ways in
which the poem discusses or comments on the problems or issues. Your response should be 1-2 paragraphs long.
London
BY WILLIAM BLAKE
I wander thro’ each charter’d
street,
Near where the charter’d Thames
does flow.
And mark in every face I meet
Marks of weakness, marks of woe.
In every cry of every Man,
In every Infants cry of fear,
In every voice: in every ban,
The mind-forg’d manacles I
hear
How the Chimney-sweepers cry
Every blackning Church
appalls,
And the hapless Soldiers sigh
Runs in blood down Palace
walls
But most thro’ midnight streets I
hear
How the youthful Harlots curse
Blasts the new-born Infants
tear
And blights with plagues the Marriage hea

INTRODUCTION:

The two poems “To Marguerite: Continued” by Matthew Arnold and “London” by William Blake explore different aspects of human life and emotions. “To Marguerite: Continued” reflects on the human desire for companionship and the feeling of isolation. On the other hand, “London” critiques the social and economic issues of 18th century England. Both poems use powerful imagery to convey their respective emotions and ideas.

DESCRIPTION OF ESSAY QUESTIONS:

1. How does imagery help evoke emotion in this poem? Choose three images from the poem and describe the emotions that the images evoke. Explain how the images are connected to the emotions.

In “To Marguerite: Continued,” Matthew Arnold uses vivid imagery to create a sense of loneliness and longing. The speaker describes how humans live alone in a sea of life and feel like disconnected islands. The images of the sea, moon, and nightingales evoke strong emotions of nostalgia and yearning for unity. The sea symbolizes the vastness and separation between humans, while the moon and nightingales represent the beauty and harmony that humans long for. The three images are interconnected as they all evoke a sense of longing and a desire to reunite with others.

2. How does London reflect the issues and characteristics of the Romantic period? Describe three ways in which the poem discusses or comments on the problems or issues.

“London” by William Blake is a poem that reflects the social and economic issues of the Romantic period in England. The poem discusses the problems of poverty, exploitation, and oppression. The “charter’d street” and “charter’d Thames” represent the commercialization and industrialization of society, which has led to the exploitation of the poor. The image of the chimney sweepers crying and the hapless soldiers sighing represent the suffering and oppression of the working class. The use of the term “mind-forged manacles” highlights the psychological impact of poverty and oppression on individuals. These images and themes are indicative of the Romantic period’s concern for social justice and the dehumanizing effects of modernization.

Objectives and Learning Outcomes:

1. How does imagery help evoke emotion in this poem? Choose three images from the poem and describe the emotions that the images evoke. Explain how the images are connected to the emotions.

Objectives:
– To understand the impact of imagery in poetry
– To identify specific emotions that are elicited by certain images
– To analyze the connection between imagery and emotion

Learning Outcomes:
– Students will be able to identify three specific images from the poem “To Marguerite: Continued” that evoke strong emotions
– Students will be able to explain how each image is connected to the emotions it elicits
– Students will be able to analyze the impact of imagery on the overall meaning and emotional impact of the poem

2. How does London reflect the issues and characteristics of the Romantic period? Describe three ways in which the poem discusses or comments on the problems or issues.

Objectives:
– To understand the characteristics of the Romantic period in literature
– To analyze the ways in which a specific poem reflects those characteristics
– To identify and discuss the social and political issues addressed in the poem

Learning Outcomes:
– Students will be able to identify three ways in which the poem “London” reflects the characteristics of the Romantic period
– Students will be able to analyze the ways in which the poem addresses social and political issues of the time period
– Students will be able to discuss the connections between the poem’s themes and the broader social and political context of the Romantic period.

Solution 1:

How Imagery in Matthew Arnold’s “To Marguerite: Continued” Evokes Emotion

The use of imagery is essential in evoking emotion in poetry, and in “To Marguerite: Continued,” Matthew Arnold uses various images to create emotional responses. Three images that stand out in the poem include the sea, the moon, and the nightingale. The image of the sea, in the first stanza, creates a sense of isolation and loneliness when Arnold writes, “We mortal millions live alone.” The image of the moonlight casting on the “hollows” of the island in the second stanza creates a feeling of serenity and a longing for something more significant. The image of the nightingales singing on “starry nights” in their “glens” in the same stanza evokes a sense of beauty and wonderment.

The images that Arnold uses connect to emotions and ideas presented in the poem. The sea represents separation and loneliness, and the moon represents hope and renewal. The nightingale and lovely notes connote beauty, wonderment, and longing for something more significant. Through these images, Arnold expresses the idea that although we are separated by vast distances, we all share similar longings and desires.

Solution 2:

How William Blake’s “London” Reflects the Issues and Characteristics of the Romantic Period

Many scholars agree that “London” by William Blake is a clear representation of the Romantic period. Blake’s poem discusses social issues and the suffering of individuals living in society, which was an essential component of Romantic literature. Three ways in which the poem reflects the Romantic period are through the depiction of the city, the use of imagery, and the emphasis on emotion.

Firstly, Blake’s depiction of London highlights the inequality and injustices of society. The city is presented as “chartered” and full of “marks of weakness, marks of woe.” Blake describes the oppressed masses, including the “Chimney-sweepers,” “hapless Soldiers,” and “youthful Harlots,” all of whom are considered victims of poverty and oppression. This depiction of the city reveals the Romantic emphasis on nature as a means for solace and healing.

Secondly, Blake’s imagery in the poem creates a sense of darkness and oppression. Blake’s use of “mind-forged manacles” conveys the idea that the people of London are trapped by their thoughts and beliefs. The “blackening Church” also represents a corrupt religious institution that does not support the welfare of its people. Blake’s use of imagery reveals the plights of the working-class and encourages the Romantic notion of individualism.

Lastly, Blake’s emphasis on emotion in London reflects the Romantic period’s fascination with individual emotion and experience. The poem’s tone is somber and melancholic as it describes the sorrows of living in a metropolis. Blake’s use of diction such as “cry of every Man,” “Infants cry of fear,” and “hapless soldiers sigh,” emphasizes the emotions that exist within London and narrates its people’s struggles. This emphasis on emotion was a critical aspect of Romanticism, as it sought to increase awareness of the individual’s emotional experience.

In summary, William Blake’s “London” is a representative example of Romanticism through the depiction of the city, use of imagery, and emphasis on emotion. The poem is a testament to the social problems of the time and remains a compelling work of literature that highlights the plights of the oppressed and downtrodden.

Suggested Resources/Books:

1. “The Romantic Poets” edited by John Keats
2. “The Poet’s Guide to Poetry” by Mary Kinzie
3. “Imagery and the Mind” edited by Ioannis Ziogas

Similar Asked Questions (for the first poem):

1. How does the use of metaphors affect the emotional impact of the poem?
2. What role does personification play in conveying the speaker’s emotions?
3. What is the significance of the nightingales’ song in the poem?
4. How does the specific language used in the poem convey emotion?
5. What themes are present in the poem and how are they connected to the imagery used?

Similar Asked Questions (for the second poem):

1. How does the speaker’s use of first-person narration contribute to the poem’s message?
2. What is the relationship between the physical city of London and the emotional landscape of the poem?
3. How does the poem’s structure contribute to its message?
4. What social or political issues are addressed in the poem?
5. How does the poem’s language reflect the characteristics of the Romantic period?

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