What percentage of elderly express the desire to die at home?

  

Please do a paragraph about this post with this instruction .post most have 4 or more sentences .you also have to have a high quality post from a content perspective. This means it also needs to do more than agree with or praise a class mate. If you agree with a classmate, explain why, give an example, share what you learned in the readingsA huge portion of the elderly express the desire to die at home but majority end up dying in hospital or long term care setting. The number of elderly dying in a hospital care setting is on the rise. A case study shows very few patients were asked where they wanted to die when the time comes. It is shown most DNR orders were obtained just days before death and there was not enough time to plan a safe and comfortable discharge home. Some elderly patients lived alone and did not have others to help care for them and others had family members that did not feel comfortable to watch the dying process. Their family wanted hospital staff to filter the sadness and perform the end of life care that they could not handle. (Adenwala, Ahearn, Kallat, Nidh, & Varman, 2013). A failure to take responsibility for enabling people to return home to die if that is their wish’ has been cited as a barrier to good palliative care for older people in acute settings.Reasons for this may include a lack of awareness of supported home discharge as a possibility among staff, patients and relatives, when hospice transfer is not an option (Adenwala, Ahearn, Kallat, Nidh, & Varman, 2013). Evidence based practice shows that nurses and hospital staff need to start the end of life discussion earlier and have a plan. Assess if the family is able to take on the responsibility of family member dying at home and if the patient is able to make the transport. If the patient or family is not able then making the hospital room/ area as comforting as home as they can. Implementing comfort measures and making them pain free in their last days is vital. For the family educate if patient has a DNR order than the discussion needs to be facilitated about the prognosis being poor and having no transport to hospital and letting the patient die at home. .(Adenwala, Ahearn, Kallat, Nidh, & Varman, 2013).

Introduction:
Despite expressing a desire to die at home, most elderly patients end up dying in hospital or long-term care settings. This number is on the rise, with very few patients being asked where they would like to die. Nursing staff needs to start the end of life discussion earlier and have a plan in place for assisted home discharge. Palliative care for the elderly is not being delivered appropriately for individuals in acute settings due to a lack of understanding of supported home discharge.

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Description:
A recent case study has indicated that most DNR orders were obtained just days before death, resulting in inadequate time to plan a safe and comfortable discharge home for patients who wished to die outside the hospital setting. This is often due to a lack of awareness among staff, patients, and relatives of supported home discharge as a possibility when hospice transfer is not an option. Nurses and hospital staff should assess whether the patient or family is able to handle the responsibility of family members dying at home, or make the hospital area as comforting as home if they are not prepared for such an experience. Implementing comfort measures and ensuring they are pain-free in their last days are vital. If the patient has a DNR order, the discussion needs to be facilitated about the prognosis being poor and letting the patient die at home.

Objectives:
1. To learn about the challenges and barriers to good palliative care for the elderly in acute settings.
2. To understand the importance of starting end of life discussions earlier and having a plan to make it possible for the elderly to die at home.
3. To comprehend the significance of assessing patient and family ability to take on the responsibility of caring for the elderly patient at home.
4. To learn about the comfort measures and pain management techniques that can be implemented by hospital staff to make the last days of the elderly patients more comfortable.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Identify the reasons for the rising number of elderly patients dying in hospital care settings.
2. Explain why DNR orders should be obtained earlier to facilitate discussions about prognosis and letting the elderly patients die at home.
3. Discuss the importance of nurses and hospital staff being aware of the possibility of supported home discharge as a palliative care option.
4. Recognize the importance of educating family members on how to care for the dying elderly at home and implementing comfort measures to make the hospital room more comforting.

This post highlights the challenges and barriers to good palliative care for the elderly in acute settings. It emphasizes the importance of starting the end of life discussions earlier and having a plan that allows the elderly patients to die at home if that is their wish. The post also discusses the significance of assessing the patient and family ability to take on the responsibility of caring for the elderly patient at home. Implementing comfort measures and making the last days of the elderly patients as comfortable as possible is vital. Thus, this post provides valuable insights into the management of palliative care for elderly patients in acute settings and underscores the need for healthcare professionals to be more proactive in facilitating discussions and implementing policies that enable the elderly patients to die with dignity and comfort.

Solution 1: Improved Communication and Early End-of-Life Discussion: Hospital staff and nurses should be trained on how to initiate end-of-life discussions and give patients and their families space to share their preferences, values and beliefs. Age-friendly policies and practices should be integrated into the care of elderly patients with chronic illnesses or life-limiting conditions. Patients with advanced illnesses and their families need relevant information and guidance on care options. Studies show that therapeutic communication coupled with empathy and respect promotes better understanding, lessens anxiety, builds trust, and enables families to make informed decisions(Shipman, Addington-Hall, Barclay, Briggs, Cox, Daniels, et al., 2008).

Solution 2: Expansion of Home Palliative Care Services: Incorporating home palliative care services as part of end-of-life management plans could improve the implementation of patient preferences for home death. Hospice treatments are at times not accessible due to incompatibility with beneficiary insurance plan, patient’s location or bed availability. Home palliative care services may not only be more cost-effective as compared to hospital care but also allows the family and patient to take advantage of available support networks. The availability of home care services could liberate the family from the emotional and financial burden of taking care of the dying patient and offer them peace of mind. Studies indicate that many families and patients prefer to receive end-of-life comfort and care in the setting of their choice, mostly at home( Aldridge,Briggs, Bloomfield et al., 2016).

Suggested Resources/Books:

1. “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End” by Atul Gawande
2. “The Hospice Handbook: A Complete Guide” by Larry Beresford
3. “Understanding Palliative Care” by Rachel M. Maher
4. “Palliative Care Nursing: Quality Care to the End of Life” by Marianne Matzo and Deborah Witt Sherman

Similar Asked Questions:

1. How often are elderly individuals hospitalized during their end-of-life stage?
2. How can medical professionals implement the patient’s wishes on where they want to die?
3. Are there any benefits to dying at home versus a hospital setting?
4. What should healthcare professionals do if an elderly patient does not have anyone to care for them at home?
5. Is it important for medical professionals to have end-of-life discussions with their patients earlier on in the care process?

In this post, the author discusses the importance of end-of-life discussions with elderly patients and their families, as well as implementing comfort measures during their last days. The data presented highlights the disconnect between the desire for many elderly patients to die at home and the reality that the majority do not get to fulfill this wish. It is crucial for healthcare professionals to start these conversations early and assess if the patient and/or their family are able to take on the responsibility of caring for the patient at home. If not, then measures should be taken to make the hospital setting as comforting as possible. This post emphasizes the need for healthcare professionals to approach end-of-life care in a more compassionate and proactive way to ensure the patient’s wishes are met and they are allowed to die with dignity.

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