What is the market for automated alert roster and employee check-in systems during power outages and lack of communication infrastructure?

  

Dearhere is my task , please open it and read it carefully,Discussion Questions Week 12.docPPT ch10.pptxI need very depth answers.Thank you .
Readings from Incident Response & Disaster Recovery Chapter 10.
1. Server rooms often have halogen systems for extinguishing fires. An accidental discharge of
the halogen could have disastrous results. What are the effects of halogen systems on
equipment and personnel? Should this possibility be included in the DR plan? What
recommendations would you make for this scenario?
2. What are some of the steps that an organization can take to ameliorate the distress and losses
suffered by its employees when there has been a regional major disaster that affects everyone
personally as well as the business?
3. What is the market for automated alert roster and employee check-in systems? Which ones
would be feasible if there are widespread power outages, lack of communication
infrastructure and are there any alternatives in those two situations?
4. Small companies are perhaps more vulnerable to the loss of key employees and the resulting
loss of organizational knowledge. What steps can a small company do to mitigate this
potential loss?
5. What are the various crisis management software packages available, features of each,
usability and how can they best be implemented?
Principles of Incident Response
and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
Chapter 10
Disaster Recovery: Operation and
Maintenance
Objectives
Describe the key challenges an organization faces
when engaged in DR operations
Discuss what actions organizations should take to
prepare for the activation of the DR plan
List the critical elements that comprise the response
phase of the DR plan
Explain what occurs in the recovery phase of the DR
plan
Describe how an organization uses the resumption
phase of the DR plan
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
2
Objectives (contd.)
Discuss how an organization resumes normal
operations using the restoration phase of the DR
plan
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
3
Introduction
When disaster occurs organizations need
Meticulous preparation and ongoing diligence
Quick and decisive reaction to restore operations
To prepare to promptly reestablish operations at a
new permanent location
Each area of the world has its own challenges and
risks of disaster
Natural or man-made
DR plans and procedures are similar to those
undertaken for IR and BC actions
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
4
Facing Key Challenges
Widespread disasters frequently affect:
Departments and various organization levels
Communities encompassing the organization
Vendors and suppliers
Outside help may be unavailable for days or weeks
Emergency services, public services, grocers and
other suppliers, utility services, private services,
telecommunications services, and air and surface
transportation
Worst-case scenario
Seemingly routine event quickly spins out of control
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
5
Facing Key Challenges (contd.)
Most disaster-related losses cause:
Inability to react properly to the disaster
A need to improvise, adapt, and overcome obstacles
Most disasters last hours or a few days
DR plan phases

Preparation
Response
Recovery
Resumption
Restoration
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
6
Preparation: Training the DR Team and
the Users
No prevention phase in DR planning
Reason: majority of disasters cannot be prevented
Can minimize disaster probability by planning
Preparation
Being ready for possible contingencies that can
escalate to become disasters
Develop BIA and DR plans
Organize and staff various DR teams
Train various stakeholders and practice the plan
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
7
Plan Distribution
Must distribute plan to those who need it most
Ensure that all personnel:
Have access to the plan
Have fully read the plan
Understand the plan
IR, DR, or BC plan storage
Physical copy easy to misplace
Online storage locations
Electronic disruptions could prevent access
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
8
Plan Distribution (contd.)
Store password-protected plans where employees
can access them
At the office
Away from the office
Online (anytime, anywhere)
Password-protecting all electronic files
Store physical copies in secure locations
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
9
Plan Triggers and Notification
Preparation phase: continuous
Other phases: activated by triggers

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Management notification
Employee notification
Emergency management notification
Local emergency services
Media outlets
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
10
Disaster Recovery Planning as
Preparation
Cornerstone of preparation
Developing an effective DR plan
DR plan primary goals
Eliminate or reduce
Potential for injuries, loss of human life, damage to
facilities, loss of assets and records
Immediately invoke DR plan emergency provisions
Stabilize disaster effects
Allow appropriate assessment; begin recovery efforts
Implement procedures contained in the DR plan
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
11
Disaster Recovery Planning as
Preparation (contd.)
CP team engages in scenario development and
impact analysis
Categorizes threat level each potential disaster poses
Generating DR scenario
Start with most important asset: people
Must test DR plan regularly
Ensure DR team can lead recovery effort quickly and
efficiently
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
12
Disaster Recovery Planning as
Preparation (contd.)
Key features of the DR plan
Clear delegation of roles and responsibilities
Execution of the alert roster and notification of key
personnel
Use of employee check-in systems
Clear establishment and communication of business
resumption priorities
Complete and timely documentation of the disaster
Preparations for alternative implementations
DR team members should know their disaster duties
Key personnel may include external groups
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
13
Disaster Recovery Planning as
Preparation (contd.)
Key features of the DR plan (contd.)
During a disaster response
Verify status of employees, contractors, consultants
using manual or automatic procedures
First priority: preservation of human life
Carefully record disaster from the onset
Mitigation of impact
Action steps to minimize damage associated with the
disaster on operations
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
14
Disaster Recovery Planning as
Preparation (contd.)
Additional preparations
Two types of emergency information employees need
Personal emergency information
Snapshot of the DR plan
Emergency information often encapsulated into a
wallet-sized, laminated card
Crisis management
Focused steps dealing primarily with the safety and
state of the people involved in the disaster
DR team works closely with crisis management team
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
15
DR Training and Awareness
Training involves different approaches
Training should focus on roles individual expected to
execute during an actual disaster
Disaster preparation limited to awareness training
Part of annual or semiannual security education,
training, and awareness (SETA) program
Make employees aware of general procedures for
responding to disasters
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
16
General Training for All Teams
Best crisis preparation
Ensure employees trained and comfortable in
completing normal tasks
Training and rehearsals purpose
Identify individuals with rusty technical skills
Provide opportunity to brush up on responsibilities
Vertical and horizontal job rotation
Allows preparation for normal personnel shortages or
outages
Practice degraded mode operations
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
17
Disaster Management Team Training
Command and control group
Responsible for all planning and coordination
activities
Training, rehearsal, and testing
Predominantly communicative in nature
Must quickly and effectively communicate resources
needed for subordinate teams to function
Must communicate directives from higher teams and
peer teams
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
18
Communications Team Training
Information-dissemination group
Responsible for interacting and communicating with
the external environment
Training, rehearsal, and testing
Prepares information notices, news releases, and
internal memorandums and directives
Sends communications to all groups and teams
Informs people of their tasks and responsibilities
Should be involved in routine rehearsal and testing
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
19
Computer Recovery (Hardware) Team
Training
Hardware recovery and reconstitution team
Ideally practices and trains during normal operation
Training requirements
Advanced training to rebuild systems by scavenging
parts
Knowledge in how to deal with systems damaged by
water, heat, and dust
Team should work closely with other technology
teams
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
20
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
21
Systems Recovery Team Training
Responsible for recovering and reestablishing
operating systems (OSs)
May rehearse DR duties during normal operations
Train to quickly recover systems operating system
Responsibilities may be combined with other IT
teams
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
22
Network Recovery Team Training
Responsible for reestablishing
Connectivity between systems and to the Internet
Voice communication networks
Focus of training
Establishing ad hoc networks quickly but securely
Wireless technology
Team requirements
Stash of wireless networking components stored
outside the organization
Difficult internet connectivity may need vendor
interaction
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
23
Storage Recovery Team Training
Responsible for information recovery and
reestablishment of operations
In storage area networks or network attached storage
Training needs
Rebuilding damaged systems
Recovering data from off-site locations
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
24
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
25
Applications Recovery Team Training
Responsible for recovering and reestablishing
critical business applications operations
Requirements
Skills performed during normal operations
Coordination and training in operating under adverse
circumstances
Team will have user representation
Team effectiveness
Heavily influenced by ability to create an effective
liaison with application business units
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
26
Data Management Team Training
Responsible for data restoration and recovery
Focus of training
Quick and accurate restoration of data from backup
Should include data recovery from damaged systems
May need vendor help to extract data
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
27
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
28
Vendor Contact Team Training
Responsible for working with suppliers and vendors
Need to replace damaged or destroyed equipment or
services determined by other teams
Training best obtained through normal work in
equipment procurement
Focus of training
Methods of obtaining resources quickly as possible
Familiarity with preferred vendors
Vendor relationships: crucial during a disaster
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
29
Damage Assessment and Salvage
Team Training
Provides assessment for:
Initial damage to equipment and systems on-site
Physically recovering equipment transported to
location where other teams evaluate it
Requires basic background in hardware repair
May need to outsource the function
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
30
Business Interface Team Training
Works with remainder of the organization
Assists in recovery of nontechnology functions
Training
Combines technical and nontechnical functions
Involves interfacing with various business groups to
determine routine needs
Help desk representatives well suited for this team
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
31
Logistics Team Training
Provides needed supplies, space, materials, food,
services, or facilities needed at the primary site
Require basic training in local purchasing
Primary function
Serve as health, welfare, and morale support for the
other teams doing their jobs
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
32
DR Plan Testing and Rehearsal
Testing DR plan elements
Can overlap with plan training and rehearsal
Rehearsal
Occurs when organization practices steps performed
during a disaster
Testing involves assessment (internal or external)
Before performing in a large-scale exercise
Provide classroom-style, structured training
Plan rehearsal
Start small and escalate to larger-scale exercises
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
33
DR Plan Testing and Rehearsal
(contd.)
Rehearsal and testing strategies

Desk check
Structured walk-through
Simulation
Parallel testing
Full-interruption
War gaming
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
34
Rehearsal and Testing of the Alert
Roster
Alert roster
Used in IR and BC planning, and crisis management
Alert roster document
Contains contact information on individuals notified in
the event of an actual incident or disaster
Must be tested frequently because it is subject to
continual change
Two activation methods: sequential and hierarchical
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
35
Rehearsal and Testing of the Alert
Roster (contd.)
Alert message
Scripted disaster description
Consists of just enough information so that each
responder knows what portion of the DR plan to
implement
Does not impede notification process
Auxiliary phone alert and reporting system
Information system with a telephony interface
Used to automate the alert process
Im okay automated emergency response line
Employees call a predetermined number
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
36
Disaster Response Phase
Response phase
Associated with implementing initial reaction to a
disaster
Focus
Controlling or stabilizing the situation, if possible
Response phase designed to:
Protect human life and well-being (physical safety)
Attempt to limit and contain the damage to the
organizations facilities and equipment
Manage communications with employees and other
stakeholders
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
37
Recovery Phase
Recovery of the most time-critical business functions
Get back up and running as quickly as possible
Even if operations limited to some degree
Less critical operations wait until resumption phase
Primary goals of the recovery phase
Recover critical business functions
Coordinate recovery efforts
Acquire resources to replace damaged or destroyed
materials and equipment
Evaluate the need to implement the BC plan
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
38
Resumption Phase
Focuses on non-critical functions
BIA: guiding document for creating list of primary
and secondary functions
Goals of the resumption phase

Initiate implementation of secondary functions
Finalize implementation of primary functions
Identify additional needed resources
Continue planning for restoration
Complex interaction exist between DR plan and BC
plan
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
39
Restoration Phase
Formally begins once:
All damage assessments accomplished
Rebuilding of primary site has commenced
Restoration phase primary goals
Repair damage or select or build replacement facility
Replace primary site damaged or destroyed contents
Coordinate relocation from temporary offices to
primary site or to new replacement facility
Restore normal operations at the primary site
Stand down the DR teams and conduct the afteraction review
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
40
Repair or Replacement
Two possibilities in the restoration phase
Reestablish operations at the primary site
Establish operations at a new permanent site
Reestablish operations at the primary site
Organization can rebuild facilities at the primary site
Continue partial operations while repairs made
Best to temporarily relocate the administrative function
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
41
Repair or Replacement (contd.)
Move to a new permanent site
Occurs if primary site becomes uninhabitable
Bulldoze and rebuild
Good if organization owns the land
May be months before the organization can relocate
Select a new location
Necessary when organization cannot relocate for an
extended stay at temporary locations
Selection of new permanent site: complex decision
Staff may not be available to relocate families
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
42
Restoration of the Primary Site
Occurs once physical facilities rebuilt
Must replace office furniture, desktop computers,
photocopying equipment, filing systems, office
supplies
Determine what insurance will and will not cover
Examine service contracts
Determine if damage or destruction to leased
equipment is covered by the provider
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
43
Relocation from Temporary Offices
Movement back to the primary site
Signals beginning of the end of disaster operations
Must be carefully coordinated: not simple
Must relocate people and administrative paperwork
Must restore data functions and associated computing
equipment
Data management practices
More crucial before and after moves
May require movement coordinator
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
44
Resumption at the Primary Site
Recover day-to-day operations to stabilize
organization and keep it running efficiently

Management of employee benefit packages
Employee training and awareness programs
Organizational planning retreats and meetings
Routine progress meetings and reports
Long-term planning activities
Research and development activities
Business now reconstituted and functioning as it did
before the disaster
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
45
Standing Down and the After-Action
Review
Standing down
Deactivation of DR teams
Releasing individuals back to their normal duties
After-action review (AAR)

Last activity before declaring disaster officially over
Management obtains input and feedback from teams
Information combined with official disaster log
Official log: legal and planning record and training tool
Last step: creation and archiving of the official report
Legal document for insurance, parent organization
Once archived, disaster over
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
46
Summary
Matter of time until a disaster strikes
Meticulous preparation and ongoing diligence needed
to properly respond
DR plan implementation involves five phases
Preparation, response, recovery, resumption,
restoration
DR and business resumption planning goals
Eliminate or reduce potential injuries or loss of human
life, facility damage, loss of assets and records
Stabilize the effects of the disaster
Implement DR and BR procedures
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
47
Summary (contd.)
Recovery phase
Quick critical business function recovery
Resumption
Focuses on remaining unrestored functions
Restoration phase primary goals
Repair damage or select or build replacement facility
Replace primary site damaged or destroyed contents
Coordinate relocation from temporary offices to
primary site or to new replacement facility
Restore normal operations at the primary site
Stand down the DR teams; conduct the AAR
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
48

Introduction:
Disasters can be catastrophic for organizations, affecting various departments, community levels, suppliers, and services. In addition to the loss of property and revenue, disasters can also severely affect personnel. Hence, meticulous preparation and prompt response are crucial for organizations to recover from disasters, resume normal operations and mitigate losses.

Description:
The readings from Chapter 10 of the Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, cover the various challenges that organizations face during Disaster Recovery (DR) operations. The chapter focuses on the DR plan and its phases – Preparation, Response, Recovery, Resumption, and Restoration. It also highlights the critical elements that make up the response phase of the DR plan.

The chapter poses some important questions for organizations to consider in their DR planning. For instance, it questions the safety of halogen systems used for extinguishing fires in server rooms and recommends including such possibilities in the DR plan. The chapter also suggests ways in which organizations can ameliorate the distress and losses suffered by employees in the event of a regional major disaster.

Moreover, the chapter explores areas such as automated alert rosters, crisis management software packages, and the market for employee check-in systems. It also looks at how small companies can mitigate potential losses resulting from the loss of key employees and highlights the challenges that organizations face in resuming normal operations. In essence, the chapter provides valuable insights into DR operations and how organizations can effectively prepare for, and respond to, disasters of different magnitudes and durations.

Objectives:
– To understand the effects of halogen systems on equipment and personnel in server rooms and make recommendations for including this possibility in the DR plan.
– To identify steps that an organization can take to ameliorate distress and losses suffered by employees after a regional major disaster.
– To explore the market for automated alert roster and employee check-in systems and identify feasible options in situations of widespread power outages and lack of communication infrastructure.
– To suggest ways for small companies to mitigate the potential loss of key employees and organizational knowledge.
– To evaluate various crisis management software packages and determine how they can be best implemented in an organization.

Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this chapter, the reader should be able to:
– Evaluate the potential effects of accidental discharge of halogen systems on equipment and personnel in server rooms and provide recommendations for incorporating this possibility in the DR plan.
– Identify and describe steps an organization can take to support its employees during a regional major disaster that affects everyone personally and professionally.
– Evaluate the market for automated alert roster and employee check-in systems, determine feasible options in situations of widespread power outages and lack of communication infrastructure, and recommend appropriate solutions.
– Analyze ways for small companies to mitigate the potential loss of key employees and organizational knowledge, and recommend appropriate measures for the same.
– Determine the suitability of various crisis management software packages for an organization, identify their features and usability, and recommend best practices for implementation of the same.

Solution 1: Halogen Systems and Disaster Recovery Plan

Halogen systems are commonly used in server rooms as fire extinguishers. However, an accidental discharge of halogen can result in severe damage to both equipment and personnel. The effects of halogen systems on equipment include corrosion and contamination, which may cause malfunctions, failure, or potential safety hazards. On personnel, halogen systems can cause acute respiratory irritation, skin irritation, and severe eye irritation.

Considering the potential harm caused by halogen systems, it is essential to include the possibility of accidental discharge in the Disaster Recovery (DR) plan. To ensure the safety of personnel and limit equipment damage, the DR plan should include regular maintenance and inspections of the halogen system and training of personnel on how to react in the event of an accidental discharge.

It is also important to have proper ventilation systems in place to minimize the effects of halogen fumes. As a recommendation, the DR plan should include a risk assessment of the equipment and personnel in the server room and an action plan to mitigate any potential risks.

Solution 2: Mitigating Losses in a Regional Disaster

When a regional disaster strikes, it not only affects the business but also the employees personally. Therefore, it is crucial for organizations to take steps to ameliorate the distress and losses suffered by employees.

The organization can provide crisis counseling services, temporary housing, and financial assistance to employees in need. The company can also offer flexible work arrangements, such as remote work or flexible hours, to employees who may have challenges commuting to the workplace.

To ensure business continuity, the DR plan should include clear communication protocols to reach all employees in case of a disaster. The DR plan should have guidelines on employee safety and well-being, including the coordination of emergency services and evacuation plans.

In conclusion, the organization should prioritize the safety and well-being of employees during a regional disaster, and the DR plan should include measures to mitigate damages suffered by employees.

Suggested Resources/Books:

1. “Disaster Recovery Planning: Preparing for the Unthinkable” by Jon William Toigo
2. “Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery” by Michael E. Whitman and Herbert J. Mattord
3. “Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning for IT Professionals” by Susan Snedaker
4. “Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity: A Quick Guide for Small Organizations and Busy Executives” by Charlie Carpenter
5. “The Disaster Recovery Handbook: A Step-by-Step Plan to Ensure Business Continuity and Protect Vital Operations, Facilities, and Assets” by Michael Wallace and Lawrence Webber

Similar Asked Questions:

1. What are some of the common challenges that organizations face during disaster recovery operations?
2. How can an organization prepare for the activation of the DR plan?
3. What are the critical elements of the response phase in a disaster recovery plan?
4. How does an organization use the resumption phase in a DR plan to resume normal operations?
5. What are some of the key steps that small companies can take to mitigate the loss of key employees in a disaster scenario?Dearhere is my task , please open it and read it carefully,Discussion Questions Week 12.docPPT ch10.pptxI need very depth answers.Thank you .
Readings from Incident Response & Disaster Recovery Chapter 10.
1. Server rooms often have halogen systems for extinguishing fires. An accidental discharge of
the halogen could have disastrous results. What are the effects of halogen systems on
equipment and personnel? Should this possibility be included in the DR plan? What
recommendations would you make for this scenario?
2. What are some of the steps that an organization can take to ameliorate the distress and losses
suffered by its employees when there has been a regional major disaster that affects everyone
personally as well as the business?
3. What is the market for automated alert roster and employee check-in systems? Which ones
would be feasible if there are widespread power outages, lack of communication
infrastructure and are there any alternatives in those two situations?
4. Small companies are perhaps more vulnerable to the loss of key employees and the resulting
loss of organizational knowledge. What steps can a small company do to mitigate this
potential loss?
5. What are the various crisis management software packages available, features of each,
usability and how can they best be implemented?
Principles of Incident Response
and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
Chapter 10
Disaster Recovery: Operation and
Maintenance
Objectives
Describe the key challenges an organization faces
when engaged in DR operations
Discuss what actions organizations should take to
prepare for the activation of the DR plan
List the critical elements that comprise the response
phase of the DR plan
Explain what occurs in the recovery phase of the DR
plan
Describe how an organization uses the resumption
phase of the DR plan
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
2
Objectives (contd.)
Discuss how an organization resumes normal
operations using the restoration phase of the DR
plan
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
3
Introduction
When disaster occurs organizations need
Meticulous preparation and ongoing diligence
Quick and decisive reaction to restore operations
To prepare to promptly reestablish operations at a
new permanent location
Each area of the world has its own challenges and
risks of disaster
Natural or man-made
DR plans and procedures are similar to those
undertaken for IR and BC actions
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
4
Facing Key Challenges
Widespread disasters frequently affect:
Departments and various organization levels
Communities encompassing the organization
Vendors and suppliers
Outside help may be unavailable for days or weeks
Emergency services, public services, grocers and
other suppliers, utility services, private services,
telecommunications services, and air and surface
transportation
Worst-case scenario
Seemingly routine event quickly spins out of control
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
5
Facing Key Challenges (contd.)
Most disaster-related losses cause:
Inability to react properly to the disaster
A need to improvise, adapt, and overcome obstacles
Most disasters last hours or a few days
DR plan phases

Preparation
Response
Recovery
Resumption
Restoration
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
6
Preparation: Training the DR Team and
the Users
No prevention phase in DR planning
Reason: majority of disasters cannot be prevented
Can minimize disaster probability by planning
Preparation
Being ready for possible contingencies that can
escalate to become disasters
Develop BIA and DR plans
Organize and staff various DR teams
Train various stakeholders and practice the plan
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
7
Plan Distribution
Must distribute plan to those who need it most
Ensure that all personnel:
Have access to the plan
Have fully read the plan
Understand the plan
IR, DR, or BC plan storage
Physical copy easy to misplace
Online storage locations
Electronic disruptions could prevent access
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
8
Plan Distribution (contd.)
Store password-protected plans where employees
can access them
At the office
Away from the office
Online (anytime, anywhere)
Password-protecting all electronic files
Store physical copies in secure locations
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
9
Plan Triggers and Notification
Preparation phase: continuous
Other phases: activated by triggers

Management notification
Employee notification
Emergency management notification
Local emergency services
Media outlets
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
10
Disaster Recovery Planning as
Preparation
Cornerstone of preparation
Developing an effective DR plan
DR plan primary goals
Eliminate or reduce
Potential for injuries, loss of human life, damage to
facilities, loss of assets and records
Immediately invoke DR plan emergency provisions
Stabilize disaster effects
Allow appropriate assessment; begin recovery efforts
Implement procedures contained in the DR plan
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
11
Disaster Recovery Planning as
Preparation (contd.)
CP team engages in scenario development and
impact analysis
Categorizes threat level each potential disaster poses
Generating DR scenario
Start with most important asset: people
Must test DR plan regularly
Ensure DR team can lead recovery effort quickly and
efficiently
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
12
Disaster Recovery Planning as
Preparation (contd.)
Key features of the DR plan
Clear delegation of roles and responsibilities
Execution of the alert roster and notification of key
personnel
Use of employee check-in systems
Clear establishment and communication of business
resumption priorities
Complete and timely documentation of the disaster
Preparations for alternative implementations
DR team members should know their disaster duties
Key personnel may include external groups
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
13
Disaster Recovery Planning as
Preparation (contd.)
Key features of the DR plan (contd.)
During a disaster response
Verify status of employees, contractors, consultants
using manual or automatic procedures
First priority: preservation of human life
Carefully record disaster from the onset
Mitigation of impact
Action steps to minimize damage associated with the
disaster on operations
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
14
Disaster Recovery Planning as
Preparation (contd.)
Additional preparations
Two types of emergency information employees need
Personal emergency information
Snapshot of the DR plan
Emergency information often encapsulated into a
wallet-sized, laminated card
Crisis management
Focused steps dealing primarily with the safety and
state of the people involved in the disaster
DR team works closely with crisis management team
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
15
DR Training and Awareness
Training involves different approaches
Training should focus on roles individual expected to
execute during an actual disaster
Disaster preparation limited to awareness training
Part of annual or semiannual security education,
training, and awareness (SETA) program
Make employees aware of general procedures for
responding to disasters
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
16
General Training for All Teams
Best crisis preparation
Ensure employees trained and comfortable in
completing normal tasks
Training and rehearsals purpose
Identify individuals with rusty technical skills
Provide opportunity to brush up on responsibilities
Vertical and horizontal job rotation
Allows preparation for normal personnel shortages or
outages
Practice degraded mode operations
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
17
Disaster Management Team Training
Command and control group
Responsible for all planning and coordination
activities
Training, rehearsal, and testing
Predominantly communicative in nature
Must quickly and effectively communicate resources
needed for subordinate teams to function
Must communicate directives from higher teams and
peer teams
Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
18
Communications Team Training
Information-dissemination group
Responsible for interacting and communicating with
the external environment
Training, rehearsal, and testing
Prepares information notices, news releases, and
internal memorandums and directives
Sends communications to all groups and teams
Informs people of their tasks and responsibilities
Should be involved in routine rehearsal and testing
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Computer Recovery (Hardware) Team
Training
Hardware recovery and reconstitution team
Ideally practices and trains during normal operation
Training requirements
Advanced training to rebuild systems by scavenging
parts
Knowledge in how to deal with systems damaged by
water, heat, and dust
Team should work closely with other technology
teams
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Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
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Systems Recovery Team Training
Responsible for recovering and reestablishing
operating systems (OSs)
May rehearse DR duties during normal operations
Train to quickly recover systems operating system
Responsibilities may be combined with other IT
teams
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Network Recovery Team Training
Responsible for reestablishing
Connectivity between systems and to the Internet
Voice communication networks
Focus of training
Establishing ad hoc networks quickly but securely
Wireless technology
Team requirements
Stash of wireless networking components stored
outside the organization
Difficult internet connectivity may need vendor
interaction
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Storage Recovery Team Training
Responsible for information recovery and
reestablishment of operations
In storage area networks or network attached storage
Training needs
Rebuilding damaged systems
Recovering data from off-site locations
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Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
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Applications Recovery Team Training
Responsible for recovering and reestablishing
critical business applications operations
Requirements
Skills performed during normal operations
Coordination and training in operating under adverse
circumstances
Team will have user representation
Team effectiveness
Heavily influenced by ability to create an effective
liaison with application business units
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Data Management Team Training
Responsible for data restoration and recovery
Focus of training
Quick and accurate restoration of data from backup
Should include data recovery from damaged systems
May need vendor help to extract data
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Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, 2nd Edition
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Vendor Contact Team Training
Responsible for working with suppliers and vendors
Need to replace damaged or destroyed equipment or
services determined by other teams
Training best obtained through normal work in
equipment procurement
Focus of training
Methods of obtaining resources quickly as possible
Familiarity with preferred vendors
Vendor relationships: crucial during a disaster
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Damage Assessment and Salvage
Team Training
Provides assessment for:
Initial damage to equipment and systems on-site
Physically recovering equipment transported to
location where other teams evaluate it
Requires basic background in hardware repair
May need to outsource the function
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Business Interface Team Training
Works with remainder of the organization
Assists in recovery of nontechnology functions
Training
Combines technical and nontechnical functions
Involves interfacing with various business groups to
determine routine needs
Help desk representatives well suited for this team
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Logistics Team Training
Provides needed supplies, space, materials, food,
services, or facilities needed at the primary site
Require basic training in local purchasing
Primary function
Serve as health, welfare, and morale support for the
other teams doing their jobs
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DR Plan Testing and Rehearsal
Testing DR plan elements
Can overlap with plan training and rehearsal
Rehearsal
Occurs when organization practices steps performed
during a disaster
Testing involves assessment (internal or external)
Before performing in a large-scale exercise
Provide classroom-style, structured training
Plan rehearsal
Start small and escalate to larger-scale exercises
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DR Plan Testing and Rehearsal
(contd.)
Rehearsal and testing strategies

Desk check
Structured walk-through
Simulation
Parallel testing
Full-interruption
War gaming
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Rehearsal and Testing of the Alert
Roster
Alert roster
Used in IR and BC planning, and crisis management
Alert roster document
Contains contact information on individuals notified in
the event of an actual incident or disaster
Must be tested frequently because it is subject to
continual change
Two activation methods: sequential and hierarchical
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Rehearsal and Testing of the Alert
Roster (contd.)
Alert message
Scripted disaster description
Consists of just enough information so that each
responder knows what portion of the DR plan to
implement
Does not impede notification process
Auxiliary phone alert and reporting system
Information system with a telephony interface
Used to automate the alert process
Im okay automated emergency response line
Employees call a predetermined number
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Disaster Response Phase
Response phase
Associated with implementing initial reaction to a
disaster
Focus
Controlling or stabilizing the situation, if possible
Response phase designed to:
Protect human life and well-being (physical safety)
Attempt to limit and contain the damage to the
organizations facilities and equipment
Manage communications with employees and other
stakeholders
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Recovery Phase
Recovery of the most time-critical business functions
Get back up and running as quickly as possible
Even if operations limited to some degree
Less critical operations wait until resumption phase
Primary goals of the recovery phase
Recover critical business functions
Coordinate recovery efforts
Acquire resources to replace damaged or destroyed
materials and equipment
Evaluate the need to implement the BC plan
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Resumption Phase
Focuses on non-critical functions
BIA: guiding document for creating list of primary
and secondary functions
Goals of the resumption phase

Initiate implementation of secondary functions
Finalize implementation of primary functions
Identify additional needed resources
Continue planning for restoration
Complex interaction exist between DR plan and BC
plan
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Restoration Phase
Formally begins once:
All damage assessments accomplished
Rebuilding of primary site has commenced
Restoration phase primary goals
Repair damage or select or build replacement facility
Replace primary site damaged or destroyed contents
Coordinate relocation from temporary offices to
primary site or to new replacement facility
Restore normal operations at the primary site
Stand down the DR teams and conduct the afteraction review
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Repair or Replacement
Two possibilities in the restoration phase
Reestablish operations at the primary site
Establish operations at a new permanent site
Reestablish operations at the primary site
Organization can rebuild facilities at the primary site
Continue partial operations while repairs made
Best to temporarily relocate the administrative function
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Repair or Replacement (contd.)
Move to a new permanent site
Occurs if primary site becomes uninhabitable
Bulldoze and rebuild
Good if organization owns the land
May be months before the organization can relocate
Select a new location
Necessary when organization cannot relocate for an
extended stay at temporary locations
Selection of new permanent site: complex decision
Staff may not be available to relocate families
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Restoration of the Primary Site
Occurs once physical facilities rebuilt
Must replace office furniture, desktop computers,
photocopying equipment, filing systems, office
supplies
Determine what insurance will and will not cover
Examine service contracts
Determine if damage or destruction to leased
equipment is covered by the provider
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Relocation from Temporary Offices
Movement back to the primary site
Signals beginning of the end of disaster operations
Must be carefully coordinated: not simple
Must relocate people and administrative paperwork
Must restore data functions and associated computing
equipment
Data management practices
More crucial before and after moves
May require movement coordinator
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Resumption at the Primary Site
Recover day-to-day operations to stabilize
organization and keep it running efficiently

Management of employee benefit packages
Employee training and awareness programs
Organizational planning retreats and meetings
Routine progress meetings and reports
Long-term planning activities
Research and development activities
Business now reconstituted and functioning as it did
before the disaster
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Standing Down and the After-Action
Review
Standing down
Deactivation of DR teams
Releasing individuals back to their normal duties
After-action review (AAR)

Last activity before declaring disaster officially over
Management obtains input and feedback from teams
Information combined with official disaster log
Official log: legal and planning record and training tool
Last step: creation and archiving of the official report
Legal document for insurance, parent organization
Once archived, disaster over
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Summary
Matter of time until a disaster strikes
Meticulous preparation and ongoing diligence needed
to properly respond
DR plan implementation involves five phases
Preparation, response, recovery, resumption,
restoration
DR and business resumption planning goals
Eliminate or reduce potential injuries or loss of human
life, facility damage, loss of assets and records
Stabilize the effects of the disaster
Implement DR and BR procedures
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Summary (contd.)
Recovery phase
Quick critical business function recovery
Resumption
Focuses on remaining unrestored functions
Restoration phase primary goals
Repair damage or select or build replacement facility
Replace primary site damaged or destroyed contents
Coordinate relocation from temporary offices to
primary site or to new replacement facility
Restore normal operations at the primary site
Stand down the DR teams; conduct the AAR
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Introduction:
Disasters can be catastrophic for organizations, affecting various departments, community levels, suppliers, and services. In addition to the loss of property and revenue, disasters can also severely affect personnel. Hence, meticulous preparation and prompt response are crucial for organizations to recover from disasters, resume normal operations and mitigate losses.

Description:
The readings from Chapter 10 of the Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery, cover the various challenges that organizations face during Disaster Recovery (DR) operations. The chapter focuses on the DR plan and its phases – Preparation, Response, Recovery, Resumption, and Restoration. It also highlights the critical elements that make up the response phase of the DR plan.

The chapter poses some important questions for organizations to consider in their DR planning. For instance, it questions the safety of halogen systems used for extinguishing fires in server rooms and recommends including such possibilities in the DR plan. The chapter also suggests ways in which organizations can ameliorate the distress and losses suffered by employees in the event of a regional major disaster.

Moreover, the chapter explores areas such as automated alert rosters, crisis management software packages, and the market for employee check-in systems. It also looks at how small companies can mitigate potential losses resulting from the loss of key employees and highlights the challenges that organizations face in resuming normal operations. In essence, the chapter provides valuable insights into DR operations and how organizations can effectively prepare for, and respond to, disasters of different magnitudes and durations.

Objectives:
– To understand the effects of halogen systems on equipment and personnel in server rooms and make recommendations for including this possibility in the DR plan.
– To identify steps that an organization can take to ameliorate distress and losses suffered by employees after a regional major disaster.
– To explore the market for automated alert roster and employee check-in systems and identify feasible options in situations of widespread power outages and lack of communication infrastructure.
– To suggest ways for small companies to mitigate the potential loss of key employees and organizational knowledge.
– To evaluate various crisis management software packages and determine how they can be best implemented in an organization.

Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this chapter, the reader should be able to:
– Evaluate the potential effects of accidental discharge of halogen systems on equipment and personnel in server rooms and provide recommendations for incorporating this possibility in the DR plan.
– Identify and describe steps an organization can take to support its employees during a regional major disaster that affects everyone personally and professionally.
– Evaluate the market for automated alert roster and employee check-in systems, determine feasible options in situations of widespread power outages and lack of communication infrastructure, and recommend appropriate solutions.
– Analyze ways for small companies to mitigate the potential loss of key employees and organizational knowledge, and recommend appropriate measures for the same.
– Determine the suitability of various crisis management software packages for an organization, identify their features and usability, and recommend best practices for implementation of the same.

Solution 1: Halogen Systems and Disaster Recovery Plan

Halogen systems are commonly used in server rooms as fire extinguishers. However, an accidental discharge of halogen can result in severe damage to both equipment and personnel. The effects of halogen systems on equipment include corrosion and contamination, which may cause malfunctions, failure, or potential safety hazards. On personnel, halogen systems can cause acute respiratory irritation, skin irritation, and severe eye irritation.

Considering the potential harm caused by halogen systems, it is essential to include the possibility of accidental discharge in the Disaster Recovery (DR) plan. To ensure the safety of personnel and limit equipment damage, the DR plan should include regular maintenance and inspections of the halogen system and training of personnel on how to react in the event of an accidental discharge.

It is also important to have proper ventilation systems in place to minimize the effects of halogen fumes. As a recommendation, the DR plan should include a risk assessment of the equipment and personnel in the server room and an action plan to mitigate any potential risks.

Solution 2: Mitigating Losses in a Regional Disaster

When a regional disaster strikes, it not only affects the business but also the employees personally. Therefore, it is crucial for organizations to take steps to ameliorate the distress and losses suffered by employees.

The organization can provide crisis counseling services, temporary housing, and financial assistance to employees in need. The company can also offer flexible work arrangements, such as remote work or flexible hours, to employees who may have challenges commuting to the workplace.

To ensure business continuity, the DR plan should include clear communication protocols to reach all employees in case of a disaster. The DR plan should have guidelines on employee safety and well-being, including the coordination of emergency services and evacuation plans.

In conclusion, the organization should prioritize the safety and well-being of employees during a regional disaster, and the DR plan should include measures to mitigate damages suffered by employees.

Suggested Resources/Books:

1. “Disaster Recovery Planning: Preparing for the Unthinkable” by Jon William Toigo
2. “Principles of Incident Response and Disaster Recovery” by Michael E. Whitman and Herbert J. Mattord
3. “Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning for IT Professionals” by Susan Snedaker
4. “Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity: A Quick Guide for Small Organizations and Busy Executives” by Charlie Carpenter
5. “The Disaster Recovery Handbook: A Step-by-Step Plan to Ensure Business Continuity and Protect Vital Operations, Facilities, and Assets” by Michael Wallace and Lawrence Webber

Similar Asked Questions:

1. What are some of the common challenges that organizations face during disaster recovery operations?
2. How can an organization prepare for the activation of the DR plan?
3. What are the critical elements of the response phase in a disaster recovery plan?
4. How does an organization use the resumption phase in a DR plan to resume normal operations?
5. What are some of the key steps that small companies can take to mitigate the loss of key employees in a disaster scenario?

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