What is the From Claim to Draft process for argument writing?

  

Read through the Activity assignment on page 65. Develop three claims, and select one to take through the From Claim to Draft process. Develop your outline into a draft (no less than 500 words).complete a first draft of this piece, then revise your work. Submit the entire assignment as one document (include three claims, one outline, and one final draft)
nises) toward
Chapter Five / Creating an Argument
65
citive) best
bice? (No 1
our readers
rtance, or
. Claim of fact: Residents of lower-income neighborhoods are targeted by
the fast-food industry, and, as a result, they are particularly prone to health
problems associated with high-fat and processed foods.
. Claim of value: A proposal to ban fast-food restaurant construction in lower-
income neighborhoods unfairly stereotypes and discriminates against the
residents of those neighborhoods.
Claim of policy: The city should not implement a moratorium on fast-food
restaurant construction in lower-income neighborhoods.
sides?)
classmates, a
-ces. You have
liography. Nou
ACTIVITY
Practice writing claims based on the following issue question: Should the college
implement a mandatory attendance policy? Write three versions of a claim: fact,
value, and policy. Be prepared to share your three claim statements with several
classmates for their review.
FROM CLAIM TO DRAFT
u to make the
ritical thinking
d your ideas to
ct of your te
With a claim in hand, you now are ready to map out your argument
strategy to create an outline of body paragraph topics, to jot down five
or so details for each paragraph, and to lay out a logical order for your
paragraphs. Using the strategy questions and outline (pages 63-64), you
should be able to create a useful outline for your argument. Remem-
ber that your claim is your promise to your readers; it tells readers what
they can expect you to deliver in the body paragraphs. Thus, write your
claim out at the top of the first page of your outline, and keep your body
paragraphs aligned with it. However, keep in mind that you are plan-
ning-nothing is yet set in stone, not even your claim. If you come across
an essential topic or idea that your claim does not include, revise your
claim to embrace this topic.
. Finally, with an outline in hand, you are ready to write that first draft. Here
is how we suggest you proceed:
sponse to that
a compelling
t yet specific
to discover
down to its
-d-a process
your way to
synthesizing
laim emerge
not awkward
and compel
ant to argue
1. Proclaim yourself an expert on the issue; most certainly, you are more
informed than many other laypersons.
2. Put your sources aside-out of sightand write a first, fast-draft by using
only your outline/planning pages and the knowledge in your head that
you have gained through intensive study of the issue.
By writing this first draft-on your ownyou will avoid the common
pitfall of overrelying on source material and, as a consequence, losing
ownership of your writing. Once you have cranked out a first draft, you
can return to your sources/notes and identify relative information to
flesh out your draft and, thus, enhance the authoritative basis of your
argument.
your claim
y as a claim
to this issue
food restar
nises) toward
Chapter Five / Creating an Argument
65
citive) best
bice? (No 1
our readers
rtance, or
. Claim of fact: Residents of lower-income neighborhoods are targeted by
the fast-food industry, and, as a result, they are particularly prone to health
problems associated with high-fat and processed foods.
. Claim of value: A proposal to ban fast-food restaurant construction in lower-
income neighborhoods unfairly stereotypes and discriminates against the
residents of those neighborhoods.
Claim of policy: The city should not implement a moratorium on fast-food
restaurant construction in lower-income neighborhoods.
sides?)
classmates, a
-ces. You have
liography. Nou
ACTIVITY
Practice writing claims based on the following issue question: Should the college
implement a mandatory attendance policy? Write three versions of a claim: fact,
value, and policy. Be prepared to share your three claim statements with several
classmates for their review.
FROM CLAIM TO DRAFT
u to make the
ritical thinking
d your ideas to
ct of your te
sponse to that
a compelling
t yet specific
to discover
down to its
-d-a process
With a claim in hand, you now are ready to map out your argument
strategy to create an outline of body paragraph topics, to jot down five
or so details for each paragraph, and to lay out a logical order for your
paragraphs. Using the strategy questions and outline (pages 63-64), you
should be able to create a useful outline for your argument. Remem-
ber that your claim is your promise to your readers; it tells readers what
they can expect you to deliver in the body paragraphs. Thus, write your
claim out at the top of the first page of your outline, and keep your body
paragraphs aligned with it. However, keep in mind that you are plan-
ning-nothing is yet set in stone, not even your claim. If you come across
an essential topic or idea that your claim does not include, revise your
claim to embrace this topic.
. Finally, with an outline in hand, you are ready to write that first draft. Here
is how we suggest you proceed:
1. Proclaim yourself an expert on the issue; most certainly, you are more
informed than many other laypersons.
2. Put your sources aside-out of sightand write a first, fast-draft by using
only your outline/planning pages and the knowledge in your head that
you have gained through intensive study of the issue.
By writing this first draft-on your ownyou will avoid the common
pitfall of overrelying on source material and, as a consequence, losing
ownership of your writing. Once you have cranked out a first draft, you
can return to your sources/notes and identify relative information to
flesh out your draft and, thus, enhance the authoritative basis of your
argument.
your way to
synthesizing
laim emerge
not awkward
and compel
ant to argue
your claim
y as a claim
to this issue
food restar
84 82
30% 7:21 PM
odule 2
Writing Assignment
ment and Research and Documenting an Argument Essay
n
signment
nes
Read through the Activity assignment on page 65. Develop three claims, and select one to take through
the From Claim to Draft process. Develop your outline into a draft (no less than 500 words).
You are encouraged to complete a first draft of this piece, then revise your work. Submit the entire
assignment as one document (include three claims, one outline, and one final draft) to the Dropbox no
later than Sunday 11:59 PM EST/EDT. (The Dropbox is linked to Turnitin.)
A standard grading rubric is available in Doc Sharing for this and all subsequent Writing Assignments
and the Research Paper.
Previous

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When it comes to creating an argument, it is important to have a clear understanding of the different types of claims and how to develop them. This activity, found on page 65, provides an opportunity to practice writing claims based on the issue question of whether or not a college should implement a mandatory attendance policy. By developing claims of fact, value, and policy, students can better understand the nuances of argumentation and prepare themselves for the drafting process.

Description:

The activity on page 65 centers around the creation of three different claims related to the issue question of whether or not a college should implement a mandatory attendance policy. These claims include a claim of fact, which posits that there is an objective truth to the matter at hand; a claim of value, which makes a judgment about the issue; and a claim of policy, which proposes a course of action. By creating these claims, students can gain a more nuanced understanding of the issue, as well as the various perspectives that may inform an argument.

Once the claims have been developed, students are encouraged to take one claim through the entire drafting process. This includes crafting an outline of body paragraph topics and details, aligning those paragraphs with the chosen claim, and ultimately composing a first draft. Throughout this process, students are encouraged to draw upon their own knowledge of the issue, rather than relying too heavily on source material, in order to maintain a sense of ownership in their writing. The end result is a polished piece that demonstrates the student’s critical thinking and argumentative skills.

Objectives:
– To generate claims related to an issue question and identify the differences between a claim of fact, value, and policy.
– To develop an outline based on a claim and map out a logical order for body paragraph topics and details.
– To write a first draft of an argumentative piece using the outline and intensive study of the issue.

Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this activity, students should be able to:
– Identify and clearly articulate a claim of fact, value, and policy related to an issue question.
– Develop an outline that aligns with the claim and provides a logical order for body paragraph topics and details.
– Write a compelling first draft of an argumentative piece that synthesizes their ideas and shows a deep understanding of the issue.

Headings:
– Objectives
– Learning Outcomes

Solution 1:

Claim of fact: Residents of lower-income neighborhoods are targeted by the fast-food industry and, as a result, they are particularly prone to health problems associated with high-fat and processed foods.

Solution: Introduce and implement measures to encourage the establishment of healthy food outlets in lower-income neighborhoods to provide residents with access to nutritious meals. These measures could include tax incentives for food businesses that offer healthy meal options, grants to community groups to establish community gardens, and education programs to teach healthy meal preparation and cooking.

Claim of value: A proposal to ban fast-food restaurant construction in lower-income neighborhoods unfairly stereotypes and discriminates against the residents of those neighborhoods.

Solution: Instead of banning fast-food chain restaurants in lower-income neighborhoods, create policies to encourage local entrepreneurs to establish businesses in these areas. Implement measures such as low-interest loans, tax incentives, and marketing support to encourage entrepreneurs to establish businesses that offer healthy meal options.

Claim of policy: The city should not implement a moratorium on fast-food restaurant construction in lower-income neighborhoods.

Solution: Develop policies that would require fast-food restaurants to offer healthy meal options in lower-income neighborhoods. The policy could require fast-food chain restaurants to provide at least three healthy meal options on their menus, adhere to strict ingredient guidelines, and provide nutritional information for all meals. The policy would ensure that residents have access to nutritious meals, while also providing a level of choice for consumers.

Solution 2:

Claim of policy: The college should implement a mandatory attendance policy.

Solution: Create a mandatory attendance policy that requires students to attend a specified number of classes each semester. Students who adhere to the policy receive academic benefits, such as extra credit and the ability to participate in in-class activities. The policy could also require professors to provide students with class notes and materials to ensure that students who missed a class can catch up with the course work.

Claim of fact: Mandatory attendance policy improves student academic performance, participation and engagement within the classroom setting.

Solution: Develop a system that tracks student attendance and participation in class to measure the effectiveness of the mandatory attendance policy. Use the data from the system to identify students who require extra support, such as mentorship and tutoring, to improve their academic performance. The data can also help to develop strategies to improve student engagement, course design and instruction methods that will benefit both the students and the instructor.

Claim of value: The mandatory attendance policy promotes academic responsibility and successful college outcomes.

Solution: Consider creating an accountability system for students who repeatedly miss classes without a valid reason. Students who repeatedly miss classes can be required to complete additional course work, undergo academic counseling, or face disciplinary action. A policy that holds students accountable for their attendance and participation promotes academic responsibility and would ultimately lead to successful academic outcomes.

Suggested Resources/Books:

1. “They Say I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing” by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein
2. “The Elements of Style” by William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White
3. “Writing Arguments: A Rhetoric with Readings” by John D. Ramage, John C. Bean, and June Johnson

Similar Asked Questions:

1. What are some strategies for crafting effective claims in academic writing?
2. How can I ensure that my claims are well-supported and backed up by evidence?
3. What are some common pitfalls to avoid when writing arguments?
4. How can I develop a logical and persuasive argument, while still acknowledging counterarguments?
5. What role do sources play in developing a compelling argument, and how do I effectively integrate them into my writing?

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