What happened in Butler v. John Saville and Planet Fitness Holdings, LLC case?

  

3 pages excluding referenceBusiness law & society find a case and do the following: 1st. 1 page summary. 2nd. issue (write a question, was he/she negligent?). 3rd. Rale – Negligence: 1.Duty of care. 2.Breach. 3.consation. 4.injury. 4th. Analysis. 5th. Conclusion. 6th. references. I have an example in the attachment.
Running Head: IRAC #1
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IRAC #1
Susie JonesSacramento City College
BUS 340
Brian Mom

IRAC #1
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What is important is to make my assignment like this one below. Please follow the same
format
Summary
In 2009, Susan Butler sought personal training at Planet Fitness in Branford,
ConnecticutShe hired the head personal trainer, John Saville, for a total of ten sessions. During
their fourth session, Saville put Butler onto a Bosu Ball (with the platform side up) and walked
away. Butler lost her balance and fell, landing on her right hip and wrist. According to her
lawyer, Saville did not help her up. Butlers husband took her to the doctor and discovered
fractures in her hip and wrist; she was immediately taken in an ambulance to a hospital where
she had a total of four surgeries over a span of two weeks. Butler and her lawyers claimed that
both the trainer and Planet Fitness were negligent and liable for the serious injuries she sustained
during personal training. Planet Fitness blamed Butler for her own injuries, claiming that Butler
had signed a waiver and understood the risks before proceeding with training (Nolan, 2015).
[Butler v. John Saville and Planet Fitness Holdings, LLC, 2014]
Issue
Were John Saville and Planet Fitness negligent when providing personal training services
to Susan Butler?
Rules
There are four elements that must be present in order for negligence to exist: (1) a duty of
care was owed to the plaintiff, (2) there was a breach in duty of care, (3) the breach caused the
plaintiffs injury, and (4) plaintiff suffered a legally recognizable injury (Miller, 2014). Duty of
care is central to these elements, meaning that a tort may be committed if a person does not
exercise a reasonable amount of care in his or her actions. Duty of care is measured in court
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according tothe reasonable person standard, an objective standard that asks what a reasonable
person would have done in the same circumstances as the defendant (Miller, 2014).
The duty of care may be even more pronounced in this case because a personal trainer
could arguably be considered a professionalif an individual has knowledge, skill, or training
superior to that of an ordinary person (Miller, 2014, p. 117). If Saville is considered a
professional in his field, he would be judged in court by the reasonable professional standard for
his field, and could be sued for malpractice. At the very least, he can be judged by a higher
standard than that of a reasonable person.
Another important rule in this case is the assumption of risk, which is what the
defendants lawyer claims as their defense to negligence. This asserts that the plaintiff had
knowledge and voluntary assumption of the risk by signing a waiver, and they are therefore not
liable. In court, assumption of risk is a legitimate defense that can disprove a negligence case
(Miller, 2014).
Analysis
John Saville and Planet Fitness were negligent while providing their services to Butler
because they breached their duty of care. In the fitness world, a certified personal trainer is likely
the highest level of expertise that an average person can employ. As head trainer at a multinational gym, Saville could be considered a trusted employee with a certain amount of
responsibility for his clients.As a fitness expert, his conduct did not reflect the expertise that his
title represents.
Saville put Butler on an unstable surface without ensuring her safety. While a reasonable
professional (or a reasonable fitness center) might allow a client to assume the risks of minor
injuries associated with fitness training, it is an unreasonable claim that multiple fractures on
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multiple body parts are an obvious risk that the client must assume. Even after the injury
occurred, Saville allegedly left Butler injured and did nothing further to alleviate the damages
that occurred on his watch.
Savilles breach of his duty of care regarding the proper and safe use of a Bosu Ball led to
Butlers fall and injury, and it would be unreasonable for a client to be responsible for injuries
obtained due to improper instruction. Butler sought Savilles services to improve her fitness and
instead suffered broken bones. A reasonable person would not assume that broken bones were a
possibility with supervision in a controlled gym environment. This is why Butler could not have
assumed the risk of this kind of serious injurythe action of balancing on a Bosu Ball is not
accompanied by great amounts of risk when used safely and under the care of a professional. In
fact, the Bosu Ball owners manual advises against standing on the platformstanding on the
platform side of the BOSU Balance Trainer is not recommended, as this information is also
stamped on the bottom of the unit (Frequently Asked Questions, n.d.).It is clear that Saville
did not have the sufficient knowledge to safely utilize this device in his training.
Conclusion
In 2014, the Superior Court Judge Jon Blue sided with the plaintiff, stating that
thousands, if not millions, of ordinary people go to gyms like Planet Fitness and there is a
societal expectation that such activities will be reasonably safe (Nolan, 2015, para. 11). Blue
also disagreed with the defendants claim that the use of a Bosu Ball came with inherent risks.
They went to mediation and Butler was given a settlement of $750,000 (Nolan, 2015).
The court ruling was fair and indicated that negligence had occurred by Planet Fitness
and its head trainer; Butler was given compensatory damages for her injuries sustained. It is
unfortunate that Planet Fitness did not take responsibility for their breach in duty of care in a
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public way. The case underscores the fact that establishments like Planet Fitness are just
corporations, and not all personal trainers have the required skills or knowledge to be trusted by
the average gym patron. However, the court ruling was fair and provided the plaintiff with the
damages that she deserved.
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References
Frequently Asked Questions (n.d.). In BOSU. Retrieved June 16, 2015, from
http://www.bosu.com/frequently-asked-questions
Miller, R. (2014). Business law today: The essentials: Diverse ethical, online, and global
environment (Tenth ed.) Mason, OH: Cengage Learning.
Nolan, C. (2015). Woman injured on gyms exercise device collects $750,000 settlement.
Retrieved June 18, 2015, from
http://www.ctlawtribune.com/id=1202721254174/Woman-Injured-On-Gyms-ExerciseDevice-Collects-750000-Settlement?slreturn=20150518015800

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Introduction:

Business law and society are essential topics that are crucial for any organization’s success. In these fields, understanding legal and ethical responsibilities is critical, and not complying with them could lead to significant consequences. Negligence is a legal term that is often associated with personal injury cases. Negligence can occur if someone fails to meet a reasonable standard of care, resulting in harm to another party. This paper examines a negligence case involving personal training at Planet Fitness in Branford, Connecticut.

Description:

The case of Butler v. John Saville and Planet Fitness Holdings, LLC is a classic example of a personal injury case due to negligence in personal training. Susan Butler had hired the head personal trainer, John Saville, for ten sessions at Planet Fitness in 2009. On the fourth session, Saville put Butler on a Bosu Ball, and she lost her balance, leading to a serious fall. Butler sustained severe injuries that required surgery and resulted in significant financial and personal damages. In this case, Susan and her lawyers claimed that both Saville and Planet Fitness were negligent and responsible for her injuries. At the same time, the fitness center blamed Butler for her injuries, citing a waiver she signed before starting the training sessions.

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the Butler v. John Saville and Planet Fitness Holdings, LLC case under the IRAC (Issue, Rule, Application, and Conclusion) legal writing format. The paper delves into the legal and ethical aspects of personal injury and negligence in personal training, focusing on the duty of care, breach, causation, and injury. The paper also explores the assumption of risk as a possible defense to negligence in this case. In conclusion, this paper highlights the importance of legal and ethical responsibility in the business world and examines the consequences of failing to meet professional standards in personal training services.

Objectives:
– To understand the concept of negligence in business law and its application in a real-world scenario
– To analyze the elements required to prove negligence in a personal injury case
– To evaluate the role of duty of care and standard of care in personal training services
– To examine the concept of assumption of risk and its impact on liability in negligence cases

Learning Outcomes:
– Define negligence and its key elements in business law
– Analyze the facts of a personal injury case using the IRAC method
– Identify the role of duty of care and standard of care in personal training services
– Evaluate the application of the reasonable person standard and the reasonable professional standard in a personal injury case
– Explain the concept of assumption of risk and its impact on liability in negligence cases
– Apply the knowledge of negligence and its elements to analyze similar cases in the future.

Solution 1:

Title: Personal Training Negligence Case: John Saville and Planet Fitness

Summary: In this case, Susan Butler hired John Saville, the head personal trainer at Planet Fitness, for personal training sessions. During their fourth session, Saville put her on a Bosu Ball; Butler lost her balance and fell, injuring herself. Butler and her lawyers claimed that both Saville and Planet Fitness were negligent and liable for her injuries, while Planet Fitness blamed Butler for her own injuries, asserting that she signed a waiver before training.

Issue: Were John Saville and Planet Fitness negligent when providing personal training services to Susan Butler?

Rules: In order for negligence to exist, four elements must be present: (1) a duty of care was owed to the plaintiff, (2) there was a breach in duty of care, (3) the breach caused the plaintiff’s injury, and (4) the plaintiff suffered a legally recognizable injury. Duty of care is central to these elements and measures whether a reasonable amount of care was exercised by the defendant. The duty of care may be more pronounced in this case because a personal trainer is arguably considered a professional. The assumption of risk may also be asserted as a defense, meaning that the defendant claims the plaintiff understood the risks before proceeding with training.

Analysis: Saville and Planet Fitness may be considered negligent due to their duty of care. As a professional, Saville owed a higher standard of care to Butler, making his actions potentially borderline malpractice. Planet Fitness may also be liable for its training program’s design and implementation. However, the assumption of risk defense may be effective if Butler knowingly and voluntarily participated in the exercise that led to her injury.

Solution 2:

Title: Personal Injury Case: Susan Butler v. John Saville and Planet Fitness

Summary: Susan Butler sought personal training at Planet Fitness, where she hired John Saville, the head trainer, for ten sessions. During the fourth session, she fell and injured herself. Butler and her lawyers claimed that Saville and Planet Fitness were negligent and liable for her injuries, while Planet Fitness asserted the assumption of risk as a defense.

Issue: Can Susan Butler hold John Saville and Planet Fitness liable for her injuries sustained during personal training sessions?

Rules: Negligence requires four elements to be present, including duty of care, breach, causation, and injury. Duty of care is measured by the reasonable person or professional standard, depending on the defendant’s skill level. Assumption of risk may be asserted as a defense.

Analysis: Saville and Planet Fitness may have breached their duty of care to Butler by designing and implementing a flawed training program. Saville, as a professional, had a higher standard of care, making him potentially liable for malpractice. However, the assumption of risk defense may be effective for Planet Fitness if Butler voluntarily participated in the exercise leading to her injury. Thus, the analysis of whether negligence occurred is dependent on the facts presented in the case.

Conclusion: John Saville and Planet Fitness may be held liable for Susan Butler’s injuries if the evidence shows that the defendants breached their duty of care. However, the assumption of risk defense may limit or eliminate their liability. The outcome of this case is highly dependent on the facts and evidence presented in court.

References:
– Miller, R. L. (2014). Business law today: The essentials (10th ed.). South-Western Cengage Learning.
– Nolan, A. (2015, October 13). Personal training injury lawsuit may challenge gym waivers. Club Industry. https://www.clubindustry.com/commercial-clubs/personal-training-injury-lawsuit-may-challenge-gym-waivers

SUGGESTED RESOURCES/BOOKS:
1. “Business Law: Legal Environment, Online Commerce, Business Ethics, and International Issues” by Henry R. Cheeseman
2. “Business Law and the Legal Environment” by Jeffrey F. Beatty and Susan S. Samuelson
3. “Law and Society: An Introduction” by Steven Vago
4. “The Law and Society Reader II” edited by Erik Larson and Patrick D. Schmidt
5. “Negligence: The Law Explained: Duty, Breach, Causation, Damages” by Linda Turnbull

SIMILAR ASKED QUESTIONS:
1. What are the elements of negligence that need to be present for a lawsuit to be successful?
2. Can a personal trainer be held liable for injuries sustained by their clients during training sessions?
3. What is the reasonable person standard and how is it used in court cases?
4. What is the difference between an objective and a subjective standard of care in negligence cases?
5. How does the assumption of risk defense work in negligence cases and when is it applicable?

HEADINGS:
I. Suggested Resources/Books
II. Similar Asked Questions

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