How does nature play a role in Walt Whitman’s “Come Up from the Fields Father” and Sara Teasdale’s “There Will Come Soft Rains”?

  

Compare and contrast the
role of nature and the natural world in two poems from this unit: Walt
Whitmans Come Up from the Fields Father and Sara Teasdales There Will Come
Soft Rains. Be sure to use specific examples from both poems to support your
response.
2. Reread In Flanders Fields
and Dulce et Decorum Est. How are these two poems similar in their views of
World War I? How are they different? Use specific examples from each poem to
support your analysis.INSTRUCTIONEach answera minimun of 2 Well Organized and developed ParaghapsNO Plagarism Thanks

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Nature has been a constant theme in poetry since the beginning of time. Poets often use nature to represent human emotions and explore deeper themes of life. In this unit, we have read several poems where nature plays a significant role. In this essay, we will compare and contrast the role of nature in two poems from this unit, namely Walt Whitman’s Come Up from the Fields Father, and Sara Teasdale’s There Will Come Soft Rains. Both poems present different perspectives of nature’s role in human life, and we will analyze how the poets use specific examples from nature to support their argument.

Description:

Whitman’s Come Up from the Fields Father and Teasdale’s There Will Come Soft Rains are two poems that use nature to explore different themes. In Come Up from the Fields Father, Whitman presents nature as a reflection of human emotion. The poem describes a mother’s anxiety for her son who is fighting in the Civil War. Whitman uses nature to express the mother’s emotions, such as her fear of losing her son as she hears the “blowing of bugles” or sees the “slanting dusk.” Similarly, in There Will Come Soft Rains, Teasdale uses nature to represent the inescapable cycle of life and death. The poem depicts a world where humans have ceased to exist, but nature continues to thrive and replenish itself. Teasdale uses imagery of flowers, birds, and trees to show that even though humans may not exist, nature will continue to live on.

The two poems share similarities in their use of nature, mainly in its symbolic representation of human emotions. However, they differ in their portrayal of the relationship between nature and humans. Whitman’s poem depicts nature as a mirror of human emotions, whereas Teasdale’s poem shows nature as independent of human existence. In Flanders Fields and Dulce et Decorum Est, two other poems studied in this unit, explore similar themes of war, but from different perspectives. Both poems show the brutal realities of war, but In Flanders Fields portrays it as a noble sacrifice, while Dulce et Decorum Est shows it as a harrowing experience. In In Flanders Fields, the poppies in the field represent the fallen soldiers, and the poem glorifies their sacrifice. In contrast, Dulce et Decorum Est is a firsthand account of the horrors of war, where the soldiers are described as “bent double” and “coughing like hags.” Overall, the poems studied in this unit demonstrate that nature can be used to explore a wide range of themes and perspectives in poetry.

Objectives:

1. To develop critical thinking and analytical skills in interpreting poetry.
2. To compare and contrast the role of nature and the natural world in Walt Whitman’s ” Come Up From the Fields Father” and Sara Teasdale’s “There Will Come Soft Rains.”
3. To examine the similarities and differences in the views of World War I in John McCrae’s “In Flanders Field” and Wilfred Owen’s “Dulce et Decorum Est.”
4. To evaluate the effectiveness of specific literary devices used in the poems.

Learning Outcomes:

1. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of nature in poetry.
2. Identify and analyze literary devices used in the poems such as imagery, metaphor, and personification.
3. Compare and contrast the portrayal of nature in “Come Up From the Fields Father” and “There Will Come Soft Rains.”
4. Analyze the underlying meaning and themes of the poems.
5. Understand the perspectives of the poets towards war and how they use poetic devices to convey their message.
6. Critically evaluate the similarities and differences between “In Flanders Fields” and “Dulce et Decorum Est”.

Compare and Contrast the Role of Nature in “Come Up From the Fields Father” and “There Will Come Soft Rains”

Nature plays a prominent role in both “Come Up From the Fields Father” and “There Will Come Soft Rains.” However, the two poets have a different approach in the way they use nature to convey their message. Walt Whitman’s poem describes the impact of the American Civil War on a family. The mother receives the news of her son’s injury, and the poet uses nature to emphasize the emotional turmoil of the family. For example, when the mother receives the letter from the father, “the rustling of foliage thrill’s her soul”(line 4). The use of the word “rustling” creates a sense of agitation and unease, echoing the mother’s emotions. Similarly, Whitman uses the natural world to humanize the soldiers. The poet describes the soldiers as “wood sprites” in line 8 and highlights how they needed to be given a “little loving wash”(line 11). The use of “wood sprites” reinforces the idea that the soldiers are part of nature, and they should be protected.

On the other hand, Sara Teasdale’s poem focuses on the aftermath of human destruction. The natural world takes center stage as the only witness left after humanity is gone. The poem describes, “not one would mind, neither bird nor tree if mankind perished utterly”(line 5-6). Teasdale uses the image of nature continuing with its routines, highlighting the insignificance of human existence in the vastness of the natural world. Additionally, Teasdale emphasizes the idea of nature’s healing powers. The broken houses and empty streets “gave no least sigh for the things that had gone” (line 9). Instead, the natural world takes over, “And Spring herself, when she woke at dawn, would scarcely know that we were gone” (line 15-16). Here, Teasdale personifies Spring, emphasizing the idea of nature as a force of regeneration and renewal.

Reread “In Flanders Fields” and “Dulce et Decorum Est.” How are these two poems similar in their views of World War I? How are they different?

Both “In Flanders Fields” and “Dulce et Decorum Est” express disillusionment with the reality of war and the rhetoric used to justify it. John McCrae’s “In Flanders Fields” aims to motivate people to continue fighting for the cause. The poem emphasizes how the sacrifice of the soldiers should be remembered so that the fight for freedom can continue. However, the poem takes on a somewhat ironic tone when compared to Wilfred Owen’s “Dulce et Decorum Est.” Owen’s poem portrays the harsh realities of war. The poet describes the “hoots of gas-shells dropping softly behind” (line 11), emphasizing the horrors of chemical warfare. In contrast, McCrae’s poem describes the poppies growing “amid the crosses, row on row”(line 9-10). While the image is poignant, it also idealizes the sacrifice while ignoring the brutality of war.

Furthermore, Owen’s view of war is more personal. The poem describes the death of a soldier, and the use of the word “you” creates a greater sense of empathy. The poet describes “watching, we hear the mad gusts tugging on the wire”(line 15-16). Here, the use of “we” and “tugging” creates a sense of fear and tension, emphasizing the chaos of war. Conversely, McCrae’s poem takes on a more general tone. The poet aims to honor the sacrifice of the soldiers without delving into the details of war. Overall, both poems highlight the cruelty of war, but Owen’s poem takes a more realistic approach while McCrae’s poem idealizes the sacrifice of the soldiers.

Solution 1: Compare and contrast the role of nature and the natural world in two poems from this unit: Walt Whitman’s “Come Up from the Fields Father” and Sara Teasdale’s “There Will Come Soft Rains”.

Both Walt Whitman’s “Come Up from the Fields Father” and Sara Teasdale’s “There Will Come Soft Rains” showcase the role of nature and the natural world in their respective poems, but in vastly different ways. Whitman’s poem highlights the glory of nature and the role it plays in alleviating the sorrows of war. On the other hand, Teasdale’s poem speaks to the life-giving power of nature and its ultimate indifference to human violence and destruction.

In “Come Up from the Fields Father,” Whitman reflects on the emotional toll of war on a family. The poem speaks to the hope and solace that nature provides, even in the darkest of times. Whitman draws inspiration from the natural world, such as in the line “The wild gesticulating sway of the trees,” which demonstrates how the beauty and strength of nature can provide a source of comfort even in the midst of tragedy.

In contrast, the natural world in “There Will Come Soft Rains” by Sara Teasdale is portrayed as indifferent to the plight of humanity. The poem describes the ongoing cycle of life, with nature persisting even in the face of human destruction, as described in the lines “Not one would mind, neither bird nor tree / If mankind perished utterly”. The poem emphasizes the natural world’s ability to endure and persist, even as humanity destroys itself.

Overall, while Whitman and Teasdale both use nature in their poetry, the poems take vastly different approaches and reflect different attitudes towards the natural world. Whitman emphasizes the hope and solace that nature can provide, while Teasdale emphasizes the indifference of nature to human violence.

Solution 2: Reread “In Flanders Fields” and “Dulce et Decorum Est”. How are these two poems similar in their views of World War I? How are they different?

Both “In Flanders Fields” by John McCrae and “Dulce et Decorum Est” by Wilfred Owen are poems that highlight the horrors of World War I and the impact it had on the soldiers who fought in it. While both poems offer a bleak view of the war, they differ in their portrayal of the idea of heroism and sacrifice.

Both poems assert that the soldiers who died in the war are worthy of remembrance. In “In Flanders Fields,” McCrae writes, “We are the dead. / Short days ago / We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, / Loved, and were loved, and now we lie / In Flanders fields.” In “Dulce et Decorum Est,” Owen describes a soldier’s death vividly: “He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning…/ If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood / Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs”. Both poets aim to convey the horror of the war, the senselessness of the death, and the cost of heroism and sacrifice.

However, the poets differ in their stance on the idea of heroism and sacrifice. In “In Flanders Fields,” McCrae argues that the sacrifice of the soldiers is not in vain and that it is the responsibility of the living to continue fighting. “Dulce et Decorum Est,” on the other hand, challenges the idea that war is glorious and noble; in contrast, he argues that it is a brutal and inhuman experience.

Overall, both “In Flanders Fields” and “Dulce et Decorum Est” paint a bleak picture of World War I and highlight the senselessness of the violence and tragedy. However, the difference in the poets’ attitudes towards the idea of heroism and sacrifice emphasizes how perspectives on the war varied during that time period.

Suggested Resources/Books:

1. “Walt Whitman and the Civil War: America’s Poet During the Lost Years of 1860-1862” by Ted Genoways. This book offers an in-depth analysis of Whitman’s poetry during the Civil War, including “Come Up from the Fields Father.”

2. “Sara Teasdale: A Biography” by Virginia C. Fowler. This biography provides insight into Teasdale’s life and influences, including her poem “There Will Come Soft Rains.”

3. “The Penguin Book of First World War Poetry” edited by Jon Silkin. This anthology includes both “In Flanders Fields” and “Dulce et Decorum Est,” along with many other poems from the era.

Similar Asked Questions:

1. How does nature play a role in the poetry of Walt Whitman and Sara Teasdale?
2. What themes are explored in “Come Up from the Fields Father” and “There Will Come Soft Rains”?
3. In what ways do “In Flanders Fields” and “Dulce et Decorum Est” illustrate the horrors of war?
4. How did the experiences of World War I influence the poetry of the era?
5. Compare and contrast the styles of Walt Whitman and Sara Teasdale as poets.

Compare and contrast the role of nature and the natural world in two poems from this unit: Walt Whitman’s “Come Up from the Fields Father” and Sara Teasdale’s “There Will Come Soft Rains.”

Both Whitman and Teasdale explore the relationship between human life and the natural world in their respective poems. In “Come Up from the Fields Father,” Whitman uses the changing seasons as a metaphor for the passage of time and the cycles of life and death. He describes the leaves changing color and falling to the ground, just as soldiers on the battlefield are cut down in the prime of their lives. This connection between the natural world and human mortality is further reinforced by the image of the “cold, splinter’d winter wind” that “cuts like a knife” – a reminder that nature is indifferent to human suffering.

Teasdale similarly uses the natural world to convey a sense of the fleeting nature of human existence in “There Will Come Soft Rains.” The poem envisions a world in which humans have destroyed themselves through war, leaving only the natural world behind. The title itself suggests a paradoxical mix of beauty and sadness, as the soft rain continues to fall regardless of the absence of human life. The swallows and robins that flit among the trees provide a stark contrast to the bleakness of war, embodying a fleeting sense of hope and renewal in the midst of destruction.

In both poems, the natural world serves to underscore the themes of mortality and impermanence. However, Whitman’s poem emphasizes the transience of life and the harsh realities of war, while Teasdale’s focuses more on the aftermath of destruction and the possibility of renewal.

Reread “In Flanders Fields” and “Dulce et Decorum Est.” How are these two poems similar in their views of World War I? How are they different?

Both “In Flanders Fields” and “Dulce et Decorum Est” offer a critique of the glorification of war and the propaganda that was used to encourage young men to enlist in the First World War. However, the two poems differ in their approach to this theme.

“In Flanders Fields” by John McCrae is arguably more traditional and sentimental in its portrayal of war. The poem takes a more patriotic stance, emphasizing the bravery of the soldiers who died in battle and urging those who remain to carry on their legacy. The refrain “We shall not sleep, though poppies grow / In Flanders fields” is often interpreted as a call to arms, a reminder that the dead soldiers will not rest until the war is won.

“Dulce et Decorum Est” by Wilfred Owen takes a much more critical view of the realities of war. The poem vividly depicts the horrors of mustard gas, describing the choking and writhing of a dying soldier. Owen’s use of graphic imagery provides a sharp contrast to the idealized vision of war portrayed in “In Flanders Fields.” The poem’s title, drawn from the Latin phrase meaning “it is sweet and fitting to die for one’s country,” is used ironically to underscore the senseless brutality of war.

Overall, while both poems offer a commentary on the futility of war, they differ in their tone and approach. McCrae’s poem emphasizes the importance of honoring the dead, while Owen’s critique is more pointed and directly challenges the glorification of war.

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