How can you rewrite a fairy tale from the perspective of a minor character?

  

Project Two: Different Perspectives
Rewrite a fairy tale from the perspective of one of the minor characters in the story.
Remember this is where you get to use your creativity and use of
imagination to change the minor character’s perspective of the story. When selecting the minor character, be careful who your minor character is, for example, if your selection was the fairy tale,”The Three Bears”, your minor character would not be the Goldilocks or Baby Bear. Here is a brief example of how I changed the minor character, Papa Bear in the fairy tale,”Goldilocks and the Three Bears”.
Instead of Papa Bear sitting down to eat his porridge and it was too hot, Mama Bear served Papa Bear Fruit Loops and hot cocoa.
He decided the family should take a walk in the woods because he said
the Fruit Loops were too crunchy to eat and the cocoa was too hot to
drink. As they were walking in the woods, Papa Bear spotted a resort called “Bears Are Us”. He thought it would be fun for his family to enjoy time spent away from home because they hadn’t had a vacation in a long time. In the meantime, Goldilocks saw a small beautiful cottage. She decided to stop by because she was tired of walking in the woods and she was so happy to see this beautiful cottage. She knocked on the door once, but no one answered. She knocked on the door twice, but no one answered. The third time she knocked and no one answered, she decided to open the door… And the fairy tale goes on…
See how I changed the minor character, Papa Bear? Please do not use this fairy tale because I have already used it as an example.
To depict your story, follow the directions below:
Create at least (4 to 5) brief journal entries from the perspective of the minor character: share any of the minor character’s personal thoughts that are important to note as a journal entry.Provide a detailed outline of how you would rewrite the story if it was written from the minor character’s viewpoint.An outline is separated into sections marked with Roman Numerals (I, II, III, IV…) or Uppercase Letters (A, B, C, D…).Rewrite four or more detailed scene(s) in the book from the perspective of the minor character.
Journal Entries:
Journal entries are brief paragraphs (4-6 complete sentences per entry) involving your version of this fairy tale. The paragraphs briefly describe the main parts of your story from the minor character’s perspective. Upon completion of your fairy tale, review the whole story from the beginning to the end. Then take a look at the first part of your fairy tale, is there something in this section of significance you think is important to use as a journal entry? Document this information and move on to next journal entry.
You will continue to read and review each section of your fairy tale to
determine which parts of your story can be used as a journal entry. It’s important to note, you may need to brainstorm these entries first before you decide which parts you intend to use as your journal entries.If you have any questions about this assignment,please do not hesitate to contact me through Messages.My information is listed in the Course Menu under Instructor Info.
Outline Directions:An outline is separated into sections marked with Roman Numerals (I, II, III, IV, etc…) or Uppercase Letters (A., B., C., D.).Each section begins with a brief title involving the major points you believe are most important in your story.Underneath each Roman Numeral title, student will enter a set of lowercase letters in a, b, c order.Or underneath each Uppercase Letter title, student will enter a set of numbers in 1,2,3 order.Beside the lowercase letters, student will briefly submit important bullet statements in relation to each Roman Numeral title.Or beside the set of numbers, student will briefly submit important bullet statements in relation to each Uppercase Letter title.Each Roman Numeral title should contain at least two bullet statements.Or each Uppercase Letter title should contain at least two bullet statements.Depending on the length of your story as to how many Roman Numerals one needs along with the lowercase letter bullet statements.Or depending on the length of your story
as to how many Uppercase Letters one needs along with the set of number
bullet statements.
Note: As you can see
you do have a choice for your Outline to use either Roman
Numerals/lowercase letters format or Uppercase Letters/set of numbers
format. Students may not combine Roman Numerals/lowercase letters with Uppercase Letters/set of numbers for your Outline. If student does combine the Outline formats, several points will be deducted from the total score for this assignment.

Introduction:
Project Two challenges the traditional narrative structure of classic fairy tales by giving the minor characters a chance to shine. As a content writer, I am an expert on storytelling and understand the importance of perspective when it comes to crafting a compelling tale. In this project, writers are tasked with rewriting a fairy tale from the perspective of a minor character. The goal is to exercise their creativity and imagination while changing the way readers perceive the story through a new lens.

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Description:
Project Two, titled “Different Perspectives,” encourages writers to think outside of the box and view a classic fairy tale through the eyes of a minor character. The task requires selecting a character that is not the main focus of the story and rewriting the narrative with them as the protagonist. The writer must create at least four to five brief journal entries from the minor character’s perspective and outline how they would rewrite the story if it was from their viewpoint. The outline should be separated into sections marked with Roman Numerals (I, II, III, IV) or Uppercase Letters (A, B, C, D). Additionally, writers must rewrite four or more detailed scenes from the story to fit the new perspective. This exercise allows writers to develop their storytelling and writing skills while also promoting new ways of thinking and understanding different viewpoints.

Objectives:

– To encourage students to think creatively and use their imagination to rewrite a fairy tale from the perspective of a minor character.
– To help students understand the importance of narrative point of view and how it can change the meaning of a story.
– To develop students’ writing skills in terms of journal writing, creating outlines, and rewriting specific scenes from a story.

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this project, students should be able to:

– Analyze and evaluate a fairy tale from the point of view of a minor character.
– Develop and maintain a consistent narrative voice for their character throughout the story.
– Write at least four journal entries from the perspective of the minor character that provide insight into their thoughts and feelings.
– Create a detailed outline that includes all major plot points, characters, and settings.
– Rewrite four or more specific scenes from the fairy tale, reimagining them from the perspective of the minor character.

Project Two: Different Perspectives

Rewrite a fairy tale from the perspective of one of the minor characters in the story.

Journal Entries:

– Explore the character’s thoughts and feelings about their role in the original story and their relationship with the main characters.
– Describe how the character’s perspective changes as they experience the events of the story from their own point of view.
– Use sensory details and personal reflections to bring the character’s inner world to life.

Outline:

I. Introduction
– Briefly summarize the original fairy tale
– Introduce the minor character who will be the narrator of the story

II. Character Background
– Provide details about the minor character’s life before the events of the fairy tale
– Explain the character’s motivations and desires

III. Story Events
– Rewrite the major plot points from the perspective of the minor character
– Describe how their involvement in the story changes the course of events

IV. Resolution
– Provide a unique resolution that differs from the original fairy tale
– Explain how the minor character’s perspective on the events of the story has shifted throughout the narrative

Rewritten Scenes:

– Select four or more scenes from the original fairy tale and rewrite them from the minor character’s perspective.
– Use sensory details, internal thoughts, and unique insights to reframe the scene in a way that is consistent with the character’s point of view.
– Pay attention to details such as dialogue, setting, and action to fully immerse the reader in the new perspective.

Solution 1:
Journal Entries:
I. The Wolf’s Thoughts on the Three Little Pigs
As I watched the Three Little Pigs construct their homes, I couldn’t help but feel a sense of jealousy. I have been wandering the woods for days without a real place to call home, and here they were, building homes of their own. It wasn’t fair.

II. The Wolf’s Failed Attempt to Blow Down the First Pig’s House
I decided to take matters into my own hands and attempted to blow down the first pig’s house. To my surprise, it didn’t budge. I couldn’t believe it. How could such a weak and small pig build a house that was so sturdy?

III. The Wolf’s Persistence in Pursuing the Three Little Pigs
After failing to blow down the first pig’s house, I relentlessly pursued the other two. I was determined to get inside their homes and satisfy my hunger, no matter how long it took me.

IV. The Wolf’s Moment of Realization
As I stood outside the third pig’s brick house, panting and exhausted from my failed attempts to get inside, I realized that perhaps I had been too focused on my own needs. Instead of trying to harm these pigs, I should have been trying to help them. I could have offered them tips on how to build even sturdier homes, and we could have become friends.

Rewritten Story:
The story of The Three Little Pigs, as told from the perspective of the wolf, begins with his jealousy of the pigs’ ability to build homes of their own. He spends days wandering the woods, feeling sorry for himself and convinced that life is unfair. One day, as he watches the first pig construct his home out of straw, he decides to try and blow it down. To his surprise, the house is sturdier than he thought and doesn’t budge.

The wolf becomes more determined to get inside the pigs’ homes and satisfy his hunger. But as he tries to blow down the second pig’s house, he similarly fails. By the time the wolf reaches the third pig’s brick house, he is panting and exhausted. He takes a moment to catch his breath and realizes that perhaps he has been too focused on his own needs. Instead of trying to harm these pigs, he should have been trying to help them. He could have offered them tips on how to build even sturdier homes, and they could have become friends.

Scene 1: The Wolf Watches the First Pig Build His House
The wolf watches from behind a nearby bush as the first pig begins to construct his home out of straw. As he sees the pig’s progress, the wolf can feel himself growing increasingly angry. “Why does he get to have a home, and I don’t?” he thinks to himself. Feeling helpless and unsure of what to do, the wolf ultimately decides to try and blow down the straw house.

Scene 2: The Wolf Fails to Blow Down the Second Pig’s House
After his first failed attempt, the wolf becomes more determined to get inside the pigs’ homes and satisfy his hunger. But as he tries to blow down the second pig’s house, he similarly fails. This time, he is surprised by the sturdy construction of the house. Panting and frustrated, the wolf takes a moment to rest and think about his next move.

Scene 3: The Wolf Realizes His Mistake
As the wolf pants and thinks, he begins to have an epiphany. Perhaps he has been too focused on his own needs and desires. Perhaps, instead of trying to harm these pigs, he could have been trying to help them. In this moment, the wolf realizes the error of his ways and decides that he will try to make things right. He will try to befriend the pigs and help them build even sturdier homes in the future.

Suggested Resources/Books:
1. “The Annotated Classic Fairy Tales” by Maria Tatar
2. “From the Beast to the Blonde: On Fairy Tales and Their Tellers” by Marina Warner
3. “Fierce Fairytales: Poems and Stories to Stir Your Soul” by Nikita Gill
4. “The Witch Must Die: The Hidden Meaning of Fairy Tales” by Sheldon Cashdan
5. “The Uses of Enchantment: The Meaning and Importance of Fairy Tales” by Bruno Bettelheim

Similar Asked Questions:
1. What are some other fairy tales that could be rewritten from the perspective of a minor character?
2. How do different perspectives change the way we understand a story?
3. What techniques can writers use to effectively shift the narrative focus to a minor character?
4. What are some common themes found in fairy tales, and how can they be subverted or explored from an alternate perspective?
5. How have fairy tales been adapted and transformed over time, and what impact do these changes have on our cultural understanding of the stories?

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