How can the concepts of income inequality and institutional classism be applied to the topic discussed in the video?

  

M3- Written Assignment
PLEASE USE MAINLY THE
VIDEO AND THE ATTACHED PAGES FROM MY BOOK TO REFERNCE OR WRITE THIS PAPER. IT
SHOULD BE IN APA STYLE, CITE FORM THE BOOK AND THE READING AS WELL TO REFERENCE
IT AT THE END. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTION PLEASE ASK.
First referenceMoyers, B. (2008). L.A.
Labor [Video File]. Retrieved From:http://www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/06132008/watch.htmlsecond reference20151104124517.pdfVidal, M. (2013). Inequality and the Growth of Bad Jobs In Andersen, M.L. & Collins, H.P. (Eds.)Race, Class, & Gender an Anthology.(pp. 270-273)Boston, MA. Cengage Learning.
Write a 5 page,
double-spaced essay (approximately 1,500 words) ononeof
the following topics:
View one of the videos available in this module. Define and apply
the concepts of income inequality and institutional classism to the topic
address in the video selected. Referring to Andersen, analyze their political
and economic implications in terms of the topic discussed.
This essay
should be organized according to your own understanding of the material, with
specific references to the assigned readings. You may cite references in
parentheses in your text, using only the author’s last name and page number.Please be sure that your essay has your name at the top,
followed by the topic you’ve chosen, and a bibliography at the end.
Instructions for Written
Assignments
Your written assignments are intended to test your understanding
of important concepts and discover how to sharpen your intellectual skills of
analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and application. They are also intended to provide
opportunities to more fully describe, explain, and analyze the books and other
sources. When you submit essays, you may want to submit them as file
attachments, as these usually retain your formatting.
In addition, pleasedocument
your sourcescarefully and use proper citation for all submissions to the
course, including discussion postings.
If you need guidance
with your written assignments, the ESC Online Writing Center athttp://www.esc.edu/writerhas some great pointers.

Introduction:

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Income inequality and institutional classism are two major social problems that are becoming increasingly pervasive in today’s society. This paper aims to examine the topic of income inequality through the lens of a video titled “L.A. Labor,” and explore its political and economic implications by referencing Michael Vidal’s article “Inequality and the Growth of Bad Jobs” in Race, Class, & Gender: An Anthology.

Description:

In the video “L.A. Labor,” Bill Moyers interviews low-wage workers in Los Angeles who are struggling to make ends meet due to poverty-level wages, lack of benefits, and job insecurity. The workers interviewed in the video come from a diverse range of backgrounds, but they all share the common experience of working in low-wage, often exploitative conditions.

By applying the concepts of income inequality and institutional classism to this topic, it becomes clear that many of the workers featured in the video are facing systemic barriers that prevent them from accessing higher-paying jobs and better working conditions. They may be constrained by their race, gender, or socio-economic background, which in turn limits their opportunities for upward mobility and perpetuates the cycle of poverty.

Using Andersen’s article “Inequality and the Growth of Bad Jobs,” this paper will further analyze the political and economic implications of income inequality and institutional classism, specifically in relation to the workers featured in the “L.A. Labor” video. The article provides a comprehensive understanding of how systemic inequalities in the labor market contribute to the growth of low-wage jobs, and how political and economic factors intersect to create a situation where workers are increasingly pitted against one another.

Through this analysis, this paper will contribute to a greater understanding of income inequality and institutional classism, and their impact on workers in low-wage jobs.

Objectives:

– To define and understand the concepts of income inequality and institutional classism.
– To analyze the political and economic implications of income inequality and institutional classism.
– To apply the concepts of income inequality and institutional classism to a real-life example.

Learning Outcomes:

– Students will be able to explain the meaning and significance of income inequality and institutional classism.
– Students will be able to apply the concepts of income inequality and institutional classism to a real-life scenario.
– Students will be able to evaluate the political and economic implications of income inequality and institutional classism.

Topic Selected: View one of the videos available in this module. Define and apply the concepts of income inequality and institutional classism to the topic address in the video selected. Referring to Andersen, analyze their political and economic implications in terms of the topic discussed.

Introduction:

In this essay, I will watch the video titled “L.A. Labor” by Bill Moyers and analyze its topic in terms of income inequality and institutional classism. I will also refer to Andersen’s article “Inequality and the Growth of Bad Jobs” to evaluate the political and economic implications of these concepts.

Defining Income Inequality and Institutional Classism:

Income inequality refers to the unequal distribution of income within a society or between societies. Institutional classism is the systematic discrimination and disadvantage experienced by members of lower socio-economic classes within social institutions like the workplace, education, and healthcare.

Applying the Concepts to “L.A. Labor”:

The video “L.A. Labor” sheds light on the exploitation of low-wage workers in Los Angeles and the challenges they face in trying to unionize and improve their working conditions. The workers are largely Latino and immigrant, and they work in industries like garment manufacturing and janitorial services. Their low wages and lack of job security keep them trapped in poverty, while their employers profit from their labor. This is a clear example of income inequality and institutional classism, as these workers are disadvantaged and discriminated against based on their socio-economic status and immigrant background.

Analyzing Political and Economic Implications:

Andersen’s article further explains the political and economic implications of income inequality and institutional classism. She argues that the growth of low-quality, low-wage jobs perpetuates inequality and reinforces the power imbalance between workers and employers. This creates a vicious cycle that affects not only the workers themselves but also the broader economy and society. The lack of decent work and income security prevents workers from contributing to economic growth and participating fully in their communities. At the same time, it enables wealthy individuals and corporations to accumulate more wealth and power, which can further entrench income inequality and institutional classism.

Conclusion:

In conclusion, the video “L.A. Labor” highlights the pervasive issue of income inequality and institutional classism in our society, particularly for low-wage workers who are often immigrants and people of color. By applying these concepts to this real-life example and analyzing their political and economic implications, we can better understand the root causes of the problem and work towards solutions that promote greater equality and justice for all.

Solution 1: Income Inequality and Institutional Classism in L.A. Labor Video

The L.A. Labor video by Moyers (2008) highlights how workers in Los Angeles are struggling to make ends meet due to the growing income inequality. Income inequality is a term used to describe the unequal distribution of earnings among individuals or households in a society. In the L.A. Labor video, workers are seen working for very low wages, while their employers make huge profits. This is because of institutional classism, which refers to the discrimination based on social class or economic status in institutions such as the workplace, education, and healthcare.

According to Vidal (2013), income inequality and institutional classism have political and economic implications. On the political front, income inequality and institutional classism undermine democracy by reducing the say of the poor and working-class people in the decision-making process. This is because the wealthy class has more resources to influence political decisions than the working class. On the economic front, income inequality and institutional classism limit economic growth through reduced consumer demand, limited access to education and healthcare, and reduced productivity.

The implications of income inequality and institutional classism in the L.A. Labor video are also evident in the working conditions of the workers. The workers are poorly paid, work long hours without overtime, and most of them lack job security. This means they cannot plan for the future, such as buying a house or starting a family. This is because institutional classism ensures that they remain in their social class and cannot move up to higher-paying jobs.

The solution to income inequality and institutional classism is to address their root causes. This requires a political will to address the issue and ensure that the working-class people are fairly represented in the decision-making process. It is important to promote policies that support fair wages, job security, and opportunities for advancement. Also, education and healthcare should be made accessible to all, regardless of their social class or economic status. In this way, institutional classism can be eradicated and income inequality reduced.

Solution 2: Income Inequality and Institutional Classism in the Bad Jobs

Vidal (2013) highlights how income inequality and institutional classism have contributed to the growing number of bad jobs in America. Bad jobs refer to those that offer low wages, poor working conditions, and no benefits. The growing number of bad jobs is due to income inequality, which favors the wealthy class while exploiting the working-class people. Moreover, institutional classism ensures that the working-class people remain in their social class and cannot move to better-paying jobs.

The political and economic implications of income inequality and institutional classism are evident in the workforce. Workers in bad jobs work for long hours, have limited access to education and healthcare, and are poorly paid. This means that they cannot plan for the future, which limits economic growth through reduced consumer demand and limited access to education and healthcare.

To address income inequality and institutional classism, policymakers must promote policies that support fair wages, job security, and opportunities for advancement. Education and healthcare should also be made accessible to all, regardless of their social class or economic status. By doing so, institutional classism can be eradicated, and income inequality reduced. This would create a level playing field for all individuals and ensure that everyone has the opportunity to move up the social ladder.

In conclusion, income inequality and institutional classism are serious social and economic issues that require urgent attention from policymakers. It is vital to address their root causes and ensure that everyone has equal access to education, healthcare, and job opportunities. By doing so, we can promote economic growth and create a more equitable society.

Suggested Resources/Books:

1. “The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them” by Joseph E. Stiglitz
2. “Capital in the Twenty-First Century” by Thomas Piketty
3. “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness” by Michelle Alexander
4. “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City” by Matthew Desmond
5. “Race, Class, and Gender in the United States: An Integrated Study” by Paula S. Rothenberg

Similar asked questions:

1. How does income inequality and institutional classism affect society?
2. What are some examples of institutional classism in the United States?
3. How do political and economic factors contribute to income inequality?
4. What are the long-term effects of income inequality on society and the economy?
5. How can policy changes address income inequality and institutional classism?

Defining Income Inequality and Institutional Classism:

In the video “L.A. Labor”, Bill Moyers interviews workers in Los Angeles who are struggling to make ends meet while working long hours in low-wage jobs. Income inequality, defined as the unequal distribution of wealth and income among different individuals or groups, is a clear issue in this video. The workers describe how they are unable to afford basic necessities like rent and healthcare, and must work multiple jobs just to make ends meet. This highlights the vast disparity in income and wealth between different socioeconomic groups in the United States.

Additionally, institutional classism, or the systemic discrimination against certain social classes, is prevalent in this video. The workers describe how they are denied basic wage and hour protections, and are often subject to dangerous working conditions. These institutional policies and practices perpetuate the cycle of poverty and income inequality by limiting opportunities for upward mobility and trapping individuals in low-wage jobs.

Analyzing Implications:

In their essay “Inequality and the Growth of Bad Jobs”, Vidal and Andersen discuss the political and economic implications of income inequality and institutional classism. They argue that these issues create a “two-tiered” labor market, where low-wage jobs with little stability or job security are increasingly prevalent. This has resulted in the growth of a “precariat” class, which consists of workers who live in a constant state of insecurity and precariousness.

In terms of political implications, Vidal and Andersen argue that the growth of bad jobs and income inequality has eroded the power of unions and worker organizations, making it more difficult for workers to advocate for their rights and demand better wages and working conditions. This has also resulted in a decline in political participation among lower-income individuals, as they are less likely to believe that their voices will be heard by elected officials.

Economically, Vidal and Andersen argue that income inequality and institutional classism are contributing to slower rates of economic growth by limiting opportunities for consumption and innovation. This is because lower-income individuals have less disposable income to spend on goods and services, and are also less likely to have access to education and training programs that can help them advance in their careers.

In conclusion, income inequality and institutional classism are both major issues that perpetuate the cycle of poverty and limit opportunities for upward mobility in the United States. Policy changes, such as increasing the minimum wage and strengthening worker protections, can help to address these issues and promote greater equality and economic growth.M3- Written Assignment
PLEASE USE MAINLY THE
VIDEO AND THE ATTACHED PAGES FROM MY BOOK TO REFERNCE OR WRITE THIS PAPER. IT
SHOULD BE IN APA STYLE, CITE FORM THE BOOK AND THE READING AS WELL TO REFERENCE
IT AT THE END. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTION PLEASE ASK.
First referenceMoyers, B. (2008). L.A.
Labor [Video File]. Retrieved From:http://www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/06132008/watch.htmlsecond reference20151104124517.pdfVidal, M. (2013). Inequality and the Growth of Bad Jobs In Andersen, M.L. & Collins, H.P. (Eds.)Race, Class, & Gender an Anthology.(pp. 270-273)Boston, MA. Cengage Learning.
Write a 5 page,
double-spaced essay (approximately 1,500 words) ononeof
the following topics:
View one of the videos available in this module. Define and apply
the concepts of income inequality and institutional classism to the topic
address in the video selected. Referring to Andersen, analyze their political
and economic implications in terms of the topic discussed.
This essay
should be organized according to your own understanding of the material, with
specific references to the assigned readings. You may cite references in
parentheses in your text, using only the author’s last name and page number.Please be sure that your essay has your name at the top,
followed by the topic you’ve chosen, and a bibliography at the end.
Instructions for Written
Assignments
Your written assignments are intended to test your understanding
of important concepts and discover how to sharpen your intellectual skills of
analysis, synthesis, evaluation, and application. They are also intended to provide
opportunities to more fully describe, explain, and analyze the books and other
sources. When you submit essays, you may want to submit them as file
attachments, as these usually retain your formatting.
In addition, pleasedocument
your sourcescarefully and use proper citation for all submissions to the
course, including discussion postings.
If you need guidance
with your written assignments, the ESC Online Writing Center athttp://www.esc.edu/writerhas some great pointers.

Introduction:

Income inequality and institutional classism are two major social problems that are becoming increasingly pervasive in today’s society. This paper aims to examine the topic of income inequality through the lens of a video titled “L.A. Labor,” and explore its political and economic implications by referencing Michael Vidal’s article “Inequality and the Growth of Bad Jobs” in Race, Class, & Gender: An Anthology.

Description:

In the video “L.A. Labor,” Bill Moyers interviews low-wage workers in Los Angeles who are struggling to make ends meet due to poverty-level wages, lack of benefits, and job insecurity. The workers interviewed in the video come from a diverse range of backgrounds, but they all share the common experience of working in low-wage, often exploitative conditions.

By applying the concepts of income inequality and institutional classism to this topic, it becomes clear that many of the workers featured in the video are facing systemic barriers that prevent them from accessing higher-paying jobs and better working conditions. They may be constrained by their race, gender, or socio-economic background, which in turn limits their opportunities for upward mobility and perpetuates the cycle of poverty.

Using Andersen’s article “Inequality and the Growth of Bad Jobs,” this paper will further analyze the political and economic implications of income inequality and institutional classism, specifically in relation to the workers featured in the “L.A. Labor” video. The article provides a comprehensive understanding of how systemic inequalities in the labor market contribute to the growth of low-wage jobs, and how political and economic factors intersect to create a situation where workers are increasingly pitted against one another.

Through this analysis, this paper will contribute to a greater understanding of income inequality and institutional classism, and their impact on workers in low-wage jobs.

Objectives:

– To define and understand the concepts of income inequality and institutional classism.
– To analyze the political and economic implications of income inequality and institutional classism.
– To apply the concepts of income inequality and institutional classism to a real-life example.

Learning Outcomes:

– Students will be able to explain the meaning and significance of income inequality and institutional classism.
– Students will be able to apply the concepts of income inequality and institutional classism to a real-life scenario.
– Students will be able to evaluate the political and economic implications of income inequality and institutional classism.

Topic Selected: View one of the videos available in this module. Define and apply the concepts of income inequality and institutional classism to the topic address in the video selected. Referring to Andersen, analyze their political and economic implications in terms of the topic discussed.

Introduction:

In this essay, I will watch the video titled “L.A. Labor” by Bill Moyers and analyze its topic in terms of income inequality and institutional classism. I will also refer to Andersen’s article “Inequality and the Growth of Bad Jobs” to evaluate the political and economic implications of these concepts.

Defining Income Inequality and Institutional Classism:

Income inequality refers to the unequal distribution of income within a society or between societies. Institutional classism is the systematic discrimination and disadvantage experienced by members of lower socio-economic classes within social institutions like the workplace, education, and healthcare.

Applying the Concepts to “L.A. Labor”:

The video “L.A. Labor” sheds light on the exploitation of low-wage workers in Los Angeles and the challenges they face in trying to unionize and improve their working conditions. The workers are largely Latino and immigrant, and they work in industries like garment manufacturing and janitorial services. Their low wages and lack of job security keep them trapped in poverty, while their employers profit from their labor. This is a clear example of income inequality and institutional classism, as these workers are disadvantaged and discriminated against based on their socio-economic status and immigrant background.

Analyzing Political and Economic Implications:

Andersen’s article further explains the political and economic implications of income inequality and institutional classism. She argues that the growth of low-quality, low-wage jobs perpetuates inequality and reinforces the power imbalance between workers and employers. This creates a vicious cycle that affects not only the workers themselves but also the broader economy and society. The lack of decent work and income security prevents workers from contributing to economic growth and participating fully in their communities. At the same time, it enables wealthy individuals and corporations to accumulate more wealth and power, which can further entrench income inequality and institutional classism.

Conclusion:

In conclusion, the video “L.A. Labor” highlights the pervasive issue of income inequality and institutional classism in our society, particularly for low-wage workers who are often immigrants and people of color. By applying these concepts to this real-life example and analyzing their political and economic implications, we can better understand the root causes of the problem and work towards solutions that promote greater equality and justice for all.

Solution 1: Income Inequality and Institutional Classism in L.A. Labor Video

The L.A. Labor video by Moyers (2008) highlights how workers in Los Angeles are struggling to make ends meet due to the growing income inequality. Income inequality is a term used to describe the unequal distribution of earnings among individuals or households in a society. In the L.A. Labor video, workers are seen working for very low wages, while their employers make huge profits. This is because of institutional classism, which refers to the discrimination based on social class or economic status in institutions such as the workplace, education, and healthcare.

According to Vidal (2013), income inequality and institutional classism have political and economic implications. On the political front, income inequality and institutional classism undermine democracy by reducing the say of the poor and working-class people in the decision-making process. This is because the wealthy class has more resources to influence political decisions than the working class. On the economic front, income inequality and institutional classism limit economic growth through reduced consumer demand, limited access to education and healthcare, and reduced productivity.

The implications of income inequality and institutional classism in the L.A. Labor video are also evident in the working conditions of the workers. The workers are poorly paid, work long hours without overtime, and most of them lack job security. This means they cannot plan for the future, such as buying a house or starting a family. This is because institutional classism ensures that they remain in their social class and cannot move up to higher-paying jobs.

The solution to income inequality and institutional classism is to address their root causes. This requires a political will to address the issue and ensure that the working-class people are fairly represented in the decision-making process. It is important to promote policies that support fair wages, job security, and opportunities for advancement. Also, education and healthcare should be made accessible to all, regardless of their social class or economic status. In this way, institutional classism can be eradicated and income inequality reduced.

Solution 2: Income Inequality and Institutional Classism in the Bad Jobs

Vidal (2013) highlights how income inequality and institutional classism have contributed to the growing number of bad jobs in America. Bad jobs refer to those that offer low wages, poor working conditions, and no benefits. The growing number of bad jobs is due to income inequality, which favors the wealthy class while exploiting the working-class people. Moreover, institutional classism ensures that the working-class people remain in their social class and cannot move to better-paying jobs.

The political and economic implications of income inequality and institutional classism are evident in the workforce. Workers in bad jobs work for long hours, have limited access to education and healthcare, and are poorly paid. This means that they cannot plan for the future, which limits economic growth through reduced consumer demand and limited access to education and healthcare.

To address income inequality and institutional classism, policymakers must promote policies that support fair wages, job security, and opportunities for advancement. Education and healthcare should also be made accessible to all, regardless of their social class or economic status. By doing so, institutional classism can be eradicated, and income inequality reduced. This would create a level playing field for all individuals and ensure that everyone has the opportunity to move up the social ladder.

In conclusion, income inequality and institutional classism are serious social and economic issues that require urgent attention from policymakers. It is vital to address their root causes and ensure that everyone has equal access to education, healthcare, and job opportunities. By doing so, we can promote economic growth and create a more equitable society.

Suggested Resources/Books:

1. “The Great Divide: Unequal Societies and What We Can Do About Them” by Joseph E. Stiglitz
2. “Capital in the Twenty-First Century” by Thomas Piketty
3. “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness” by Michelle Alexander
4. “Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City” by Matthew Desmond
5. “Race, Class, and Gender in the United States: An Integrated Study” by Paula S. Rothenberg

Similar asked questions:

1. How does income inequality and institutional classism affect society?
2. What are some examples of institutional classism in the United States?
3. How do political and economic factors contribute to income inequality?
4. What are the long-term effects of income inequality on society and the economy?
5. How can policy changes address income inequality and institutional classism?

Defining Income Inequality and Institutional Classism:

In the video “L.A. Labor”, Bill Moyers interviews workers in Los Angeles who are struggling to make ends meet while working long hours in low-wage jobs. Income inequality, defined as the unequal distribution of wealth and income among different individuals or groups, is a clear issue in this video. The workers describe how they are unable to afford basic necessities like rent and healthcare, and must work multiple jobs just to make ends meet. This highlights the vast disparity in income and wealth between different socioeconomic groups in the United States.

Additionally, institutional classism, or the systemic discrimination against certain social classes, is prevalent in this video. The workers describe how they are denied basic wage and hour protections, and are often subject to dangerous working conditions. These institutional policies and practices perpetuate the cycle of poverty and income inequality by limiting opportunities for upward mobility and trapping individuals in low-wage jobs.

Analyzing Implications:

In their essay “Inequality and the Growth of Bad Jobs”, Vidal and Andersen discuss the political and economic implications of income inequality and institutional classism. They argue that these issues create a “two-tiered” labor market, where low-wage jobs with little stability or job security are increasingly prevalent. This has resulted in the growth of a “precariat” class, which consists of workers who live in a constant state of insecurity and precariousness.

In terms of political implications, Vidal and Andersen argue that the growth of bad jobs and income inequality has eroded the power of unions and worker organizations, making it more difficult for workers to advocate for their rights and demand better wages and working conditions. This has also resulted in a decline in political participation among lower-income individuals, as they are less likely to believe that their voices will be heard by elected officials.

Economically, Vidal and Andersen argue that income inequality and institutional classism are contributing to slower rates of economic growth by limiting opportunities for consumption and innovation. This is because lower-income individuals have less disposable income to spend on goods and services, and are also less likely to have access to education and training programs that can help them advance in their careers.

In conclusion, income inequality and institutional classism are both major issues that perpetuate the cycle of poverty and limit opportunities for upward mobility in the United States. Policy changes, such as increasing the minimum wage and strengthening worker protections, can help to address these issues and promote greater equality and economic growth.

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