How can implications of arguments be used for evaluating and assessing arguments?

  

Critical Thinking assignment….300 to 400 words.
Assignment 1: DiscussionAnalyzing Implications
Implications of arguments can be used as tools for evaluating and assessing arguments. These can help
you decide whether you want to accept or support an original argument or not. In this assignment, you
build on the skills you used in Assignment 2 (Analytical Summaries), and go one step further.
Review the following articles:
o
o
Eastland, T. (2011, January 17). We the people. The Weekly Standard, 16(17), 78. Retrieved
fromhttp://search.proquest.com.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/846785734
Cohen, N. (2013, December 15). Surveillance: Cozy or chilling?. The New York Times, p. SR.6.
Retrieved
fromhttp://www.thecampuscommon.com/library/ezproxy/ticketdemocs.asp?sch=auo&turl=http://se
arch.proquest.com/docview/1468067997?accountid=34899
Using these articles, complete the following:
Summarize two of the authors arguments (one argument from each article).
Identify and discuss one further implication of each of those arguments. Assuming the author is
right, what sorts of claims or facts would follow from that argument?
Support your statements with scholarly references. Be sure to use concepts from your readings that
are relevant to the assignment.
Write your initial response in 300400 words. Apply APA standards to citation of sources.
Comments from the Professor below:
Get the context first:
When you analyze the implications of the arguments by Eastland and Cohen be sure you understand
American Government. The separation of powers for each branch do just that; the power of one branch
cannot be given to another branch.
Executive Branch: The president of the United States carries out federal laws and recommends new
ones, directs national defense and foreign policy, and Presidential duties.
Legislative Branch: The House of Representatives and the Senate make the laws.
Judicial Branch: The Supreme Court reviews laws to decide cases involving Federal and state privileges
and immunities set forth in the Constitution.
See more of the basic stuff at this site for children::
http://www.congressforkids.net/Constitution_threebranches.htm
Assignment 1: DiscussionAnalyzing Implications
Implications of arguments can be used as tools for evaluating and assessing arguments. These can help
you decide whether you want to accept or support an original argument or not. In this assignment, you
build on the skills you used in Assignment 2 (Analytical Summaries), and go one step further.
Review the following articles:
o
o
Eastland, T. (2011, January 17). We the people. The Weekly Standard, 16(17), 78. Retrieved
fromhttp://search.proquest.com.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/846785734
Cohen, N. (2013, December 15). Surveillance: Cozy or chilling?. The New York Times, p. SR.6.
Retrieved
fromhttp://www.thecampuscommon.com/library/ezproxy/ticketdemocs.asp?sch=auo&turl=http://se
arch.proquest.com/docview/1468067997?accountid=34899
Using these articles, complete the following:
Summarize two of the authors arguments (one argument from each article).
Identify and discuss one further implication of each of those arguments. Assuming the author is
right, what sorts of claims or facts would follow from that argument?
Support your statements with scholarly references. Be sure to use concepts from your readings that
are relevant to the assignment.
Write your initial response in 300400 words. Apply APA standards to citation of sources.
Comments from the Professor below:
Get the context first:
When you analyze the implications of the arguments by Eastland and Cohen be sure you understand
American Government. The separation of powers for each branch do just that; the power of one branch
cannot be given to another branch.
Executive Branch: The president of the United States carries out federal laws and recommends new
ones, directs national defense and foreign policy, and Presidential duties.
Legislative Branch: The House of Representatives and the Senate make the laws.
Judicial Branch: The Supreme Court reviews laws to decide cases involving Federal and state privileges
and immunities set forth in the Constitution.
See more of the basic stuff at this site for children::
http://www.congressforkids.net/Constitution_threebranches.htm

Introduction:

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When it comes to critical thinking, analyzing the implications of arguments is a crucial tool that can help you evaluate and assess the original argument and make a decision whether to support or accept it. In this assignment, students are required to review two articles, summarize the arguments provided by the authors, and identify and discuss one further implication of each argument. Moreover, the assignment requires linking the arguments with relevant concepts, supporting the statements with credible references, and applying APA citation standards.

Description:

The Critical Thinking assignment requires students to review two articles written by Eastland and Cohen and analyze the implications of the arguments presented in these articles. The assignment builds on the skills developed in the Analytical Summaries assignment and aims to develop students’ ability to evaluate and assess arguments. The articles provided focus on significant topics such as American government and surveillance, which are highly relevant and require critical analysis. Students are required to summarize the arguments presented in the articles and identify and discuss one further implication of each argument. To do so, students must demonstrate a strong understanding of the context in which the arguments were presented; for example, they should be aware of the separation of powers principle in American government. Additionally, the assignment requires students to link the arguments to relevant concepts and support their statements with credible references while following APA citation standards. Overall, the assignment aims to develop students’ critical thinking skills and their ability to evaluate and analyze complex arguments.

Objective: The objective of this critical thinking assignment is to evaluate and assess arguments presented in two articles and analyze their implications. This assignment is designed to help students build upon the analytical skills developed in assignment 2 and apply them to evaluate complex arguments.

Learning Outcomes:
1. Analyze complex arguments and critically evaluate them
2. Assess the implications of an argument and its potential effects in a given context
3. Identify and discuss relevant concepts and theories from the readings
4. Apply APA standards to citation of sources
5. Develop clear and concise written responses in 300-400 words

Heading 1: Summary of Arguments
1.1 Summarize the arguments presented in two articles, one from each author
1.2 Demonstrate comprehension of the key ideas presented in the articles
1.3 Use evidence from the articles to support the arguments presented in the summary

Heading 2: Implications of Arguments
2.1 Identify one implication of each argument presented by the authors
2.2 Discuss the potential impact of the implications in a specific context
2.3 Use relevant concepts from the readings to support the analysis of the implications

Heading 3: Evidence and Claims
3.1 Analyze the evidence presented in the articles and identify the claims made by each author
3.2 Assess the validity of the claims made by the authors
3.3 Use scholarly references to support the analysis and evaluation of the arguments made by the authors

Heading 4: APA Standards and Writing
4.1 Apply APA standards to citation of sources
4.2 Develop clear and concise written responses in 300-400 words
4.3 Use proper grammar, punctuation and spelling

Heading 5: American Government Context
5.1 Demonstrate understanding of American Government and its three branches
5.2 Apply knowledge of the separation of powers to the analysis of the arguments presented by the authors
5.3 Use resources, such as Congress for Kids, to gain a basic understanding of American Government and its structure

Solution 1: Analyzing Implications of Arguments by Eastland and Cohen

Eastland argues in his article “We the People” that the Constitution should not be interpreted based on the beliefs and values of the present time but rather as it was intended by the framers. His implication is that the Constitution should be read in a narrow and conservative way, and that judges should not be allowed to create new rights or expand existing ones. A further implication of this argument is that the role of the judiciary is to interpret the Constitution as it is written and not to make new laws.

Cohen, in his article “Surveillance: Cozy or Chilling?” argues that government surveillance is a necessary evil, but that it should be subject to judicial oversight and public scrutiny. His implication is that. government surveillance in the name of national security should not override individual privacy, and that the government must be held accountable for any abuse of power. A further implication of this argument is that the government must have a balance between national security and individual rights, and that transparency and accountability are critical in ensuring that the government does not use surveillance to suppress dissent or target specific groups.

If Eastland is right, his argument would imply that the judiciary should limit their role to interpreting the Constitution based on its original meaning and not to expand the rights of citizens. On the other hand, if Cohen is right, his argument would imply that the government should balance national security needs with individual rights. The judiciary should therefore ensure that the government adheres to the principles of rule of law, transparency, and accountability.

Solution 2: The Implications of Eastland and Cohen’s Arguments on American Government

Eastland’s argument in “We the People” has implications on the interpretation of the Constitution and the role of the judiciary in American government. Eastland’s implication is that judges should not expand or create new rights in the name of judicial activism, but should rather interpret the Constitution based on the original meaning intended by the Constitution’s framers. This argument is relevant to the American government’s separation of powers, where the judiciary is supposed to interpret the law and not make it.

Cohen’s argument in “Surveillance: Cozy or Chilling?” is relevant to the American government’s balance between national security and individual rights. His implication is that the government should maintain a delicate balance between national security needs and individual privacy and that government surveillance should be subject to public scrutiny and judicial oversight. His argument is relevant in American government, where the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution protects citizens from unreasonable searches and seizures.

If Eastland’s argument is correct, then it would mean that the judiciary should be careful not to overstep their boundaries and avoid interpreting the Constitution in a way that creates new rights. However, if Cohen’s argument is right, then the government should balance national security and individual privacy and not use surveillance as a tool to oppress certain groups. Both arguments have implications on the role of government and its separation of powers, and it is crucial that these implications are evaluated in light of the American government’s foundational principles of rule of law, transparency, and accountability.

Suggested Resources/Books:

1. Critical Thinking Skills for Dummies by Martin Cohen
2. The Art of Reasoning: An Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking by David Kelley
3. Asking the Right Questions: A Guide to Critical Thinking by M. Neil Browne and Stuart M. Keeley

Similar Asked Questions:

1. How do implications of arguments help with evaluating and assessing arguments?
2. What skills are needed to analyze the implications of arguments effectively?
3. How does understanding the context of an argument affect its implications?
4. How can critical thinking be used to evaluate political arguments?
5. What are some common logical fallacies in arguments that can affect their implications?

Critical Thinking Assignment:

Analyzing Implications

Implications are essential tools for evaluating and assessing arguments. They can help individuals decide whether to accept or support an original claim. In this assignment, we will analyze two articles, one by Eastland and the other by Cohen, to summarize their arguments, identify their further implications and provide facts and scholarly references to support our statements.

Eastland’s Argument:

Eastland’s article “We the people” argues that the president of the United States has overstepped his constitutional authority. According to Eastland, the president has used executive orders and agreements to bypass Congress and implement his policies. Eastland claims that the president’s expansive use of executive power undermines the separation of powers and the checks and balances put in place by the Constitution.

Further Implication:

Eastland’s argument implies that the president’s actions threaten the constitutional system of government in the United States. If the president can bypass Congress and make laws through executive action, then Congress’s role in making laws becomes obsolete. Furthermore, the Supreme Court’s role in interpreting the Constitution also becomes irrelevant, as the president can use executive orders to bypass the court’s interpretation of the Constitution.

Cohen’s Argument:

Cohen’s article “Surveillance: Cozy or chilling?” discusses the implications of the government’s surveillance policies. Cohen argues that the government’s surveillance of its citizens is a violation of their privacy rights and can lead to a chilling effect on free speech and dissent. According to Cohen, the government’s surveillance programs are operating without proper oversight, and the government can use the information gathered to intimidate or silence those who disagree with their policies.

Further Implication:

Cohen’s argument implies that the government’s surveillance policies threaten individual liberty and privacy rights. If the government can monitor all communication, then citizens’ privacy is no longer secure, and free speech becomes a risky form of expression. Furthermore, the government can use the information gathered to target individuals who dissent, leading to a chilling effect on free speech and dissent.

Assuming both authors are correct, their arguments lead to the conclusion that the government’s actions threaten individuals’ rights and the constitutional system of government in the United States. Scholars have long argued that the government’s powers need to be checked and balanced to ensure individuals’ liberties and constitutional rights. Understanding the context of these arguments is essential to analyzing their implications effectively. Therefore, understanding the separation of powers and the role of the branches of government is critical to contextualizing these arguments.

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